Multi-GNSS & MGEX

Multi-GNSS

Multi-GNSS RNSS

IGS Multi-GNSS Working Group Charter

Established: 2003

Chair: Oliver Montenbruck

Website: Multi-GNSS Working Group Website

Knowledge Base: Multi-GNSS Working Group Knowledge Base

Mailing Group: Multi-GNSS Working Group Mailing List

The Multi-GNSS Working Group (formerly: GNSS Working Group) has been established to explore and promote the use of new navigation signals and constellations within the IGS.Its present core activity is the performance of the Multi-GNSS Pilot Project (MGEX), which comprises the build-up of a new network of sensor stations, the characterization of the user equipment and space segment, the development of new concepts and data processing tools, and, finally, the generation of early data products for Galileo, QZSS, BeiDou and other emerging navigation systems.To achieve these goals, the Multi-GNSS Working Group interacts closely with other IGS entities, such as the RINEX WG, the Antenna WG, the Data Center WG and the Infrastructure Committee. It helps to develop and implement new standards for multi-GNSS-related work within the IGS.

Charter

With the imminent introduction of new civilian signals in GPS, the modernization of GLONASS as well as the development of other Global Navigation Satellite Systems like Galileo and Compass, and further regional overlay systems the IGS is facing a changing landscape. It is essential that the implications for the service are fully analysed and that the new factors affecting its operations are duly taken into account in IGS strategic planning.

Even all currently active constellations comprise a gradually changing mix of satellites transmitting the standard and the new signals. New receiver types will have to be introduced into the network and there will be new requirements on software for handling the data in the Analysis Centres. The long lasting IGS experience of introducing GLONASS in all chains of observation, data transfer and analysis will assist in minimizing the impact of these further changes on the service operations and in integrating the new features into the IGS infrastructure to the advantage of users of the IGS products.

Thus, in order to prepare for upcoming new signals and systems it is essential that IGS gathers experience with tracking the new signals and systems, new receiver and antenna types, inter system biases, and analysis of the new signals. To facilitate these studies the WG sets up and conducts an multi-GNSS tracking experiment (M-GEX) based on GNSS receivers capable of tracking most of the new signals and systems, including experimental satellites. In addition suitable interfaces to organizations already operating or planning to setup multi-GNSS tracking networks have to be established to ensure data availability to IGS components.

As of 2012, the specific goals of the IGS GNSS Working Group are:

  • Bring knowledge about the developments of GPS, GLONASS, GALILEO, COMPASS (and to the extent necessary also overlay systems) which might help to improve or at least contribute to IGS products to the attention of the various participating elements of the IGS through reports and dedicated sessions in IGS workshops.
  • Prepare and conduct the IGS Multi-GNSS tracking experiment (M-GEX) focusing on tracking new signals and constellations by deployed multi-GNSS receivers (hard- and software receivers).
  • In the framework of the M-GEX experiment involve receiver manufacturers to set up a test bed for various receiver and antenna types as a prototype receiver validation facility.
  • Establish suitable interfaces to organizations already or soon operating multi-GNSS networks, e.g., the CONGO network and the Asia-Pacific Multi-GNSS demonstration campaign.
  • Prepare a consolidated feedback to GNSS system engineering based on relevant IGS experience of providing highest accuracy products for the existing systems.
  • Prepare a strategy for IGS participation in the mid- and longer term exploitation of the next generation of GNSS.
  • The WG should coordinate closely with, and seek inputs from IGS Analysis Centers and other IGS WGs as appropriate.

(Charter last updated January 2012)

Members

Name Affiliation Country Contribution
Zhigou Deng GFZ Germany Orbit and clock products
Jan Dousa Geod. Obs. Pecny Czech Republic Data quality control
Satoshi Kogure Cabinet Office Japan QZSS
Richard Langley UNB Canada Constellation status monitor
Huicui Liu BACC China Data quality control
Oliver Montenbruck DLR/GSOC Germany Chair, Multi-GNSS Working Group
Felix Perosanz CNES France System characterization, products
Lars Prange AIUB Switzerland Orbit and clock products
Chris Rizos UNSW Australia External representation
Inga Selmke TUM Germany Orbit and clock products
Shuli Song SHAO China Orbit and clock products
Tim Springer ESA/ESOC Germany Selected data analyses
Peter Steigenberger DLR Germany Broadcast ephemerides and DCB product
Sebastian Strasser TU Graz Austria Selected processing and concept studies
Andrea Stürze BKG Germany Data quality control, real-time streams
Qile Zhao Wuhan University China BeiDou

MGEX Pilot Project

The Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX) has been set-up by the IGS to track, collate and analyze all available GNSS signals. This includes signals from the BeiDou, Galileo, QZSS, and NAVIC systems, as well as from modernized GPS and GLONASS satellites and any space-based augmentation system (SBAS) of interest. Analysis centers characterize new satellites and signals, compare equipment performance and further develop processing software capable of handling multiple GNSS observation data. The IGS product portfolio will continuously be extended to cover precise ephemeris data and bias information for all constellations.Over a period of four years, a global network of multi-GNSS stations has been established and integrated with the existing network of GPS/GLONASS reference stations. In parallel, orbit and clock products for most new constellations are generated on a routine basis. It has therefore been decided in early 2016 to terminate the experimental phase of MGEX and to pursue the IGS multi-GNSS activities as a pilot project. Given the high recognition received so far, the name “MGEX” will be retained for the pilot project.

News

DateNews
2019/06/24Launch of a BeiDou-3 IGSO satellite
2019/05/27Launch of a GLONASS-M+ satellite
2019/05/17Launch of a BeiDou-2 GEO satellite
2019/04/20Launch of first BeiDou-3 IGSO satellite
2018/12/27Start of BeiDou global service
2018/12/23Launch of the first GPS III satellite
2018/11/18Launch of two BeiDou-3 MEO satellites
2018/11/01Launch of the first BeiDou-3 GEO satellite
2018/11/01Official start of QZSS services
2018/10/23Start of C34 and C35 signal transmission
2018/10/15Launch of two BeiDou-3 MEO satellites
2018/10/08Start of E33 signal transmission
2018/10/07Start of E15 signal transmission
2018/09/21Start of E36 signal transmission
2018/09/20Start of E13 signal transmission
2018/09/19Launch of two BeiDou-3 MEO satellites
2018/09/02Start of C25 and C26 signal transmission
2018/08/24Launch of two BeiDou-3 MEO satellites
2018/08/04Start of C23 and C24 signal transmission
2018/07/29Launch of two BeiDou-3 MEO satellites
2018/07/25Launch of four Galileo satellites
2018/07/09Launch of a BeiDou-2 IGSO satellite
2019/12/30Release of BeiDou-3 metadata (in Chinese)
2019/12/16Launch of two BeiDou-3 MEO satellites
2019/12/11Launch of a GLONASS-M+ satellite
2019/12/09Release of BeiDou-2 metadata
2019/11/23Launch of two BeiDou-3 MEO satellites
2019/11/04Launch of a BeiDou-3 IGSO satellite
2019/09/22Launch of two BeiDou-3 MEO satellites
2019/08/22Launch of the second GPS III satellite
2019/06/24Launch of a BeiDou-3 IGSO satellite
2019/05/27Launch of a GLONASS-M+ satellite
2019/05/17Launch of a BeiDou-2 GEO satellite
2019/04/20Launch of first BeiDou-3 IGSO satellite
2018/12/27Start of BeiDou global service
2018/12/23Launch of the first GPS III satellite
2018/11/18Launch of two BeiDou-3 MEO satellites
2018/11/01Launch of the first BeiDou-3 GEO satellite
2018/11/01Official start of QZSS services
2018/10/23Start of C34 and C35 signal transmission
2018/10/15Launch of two BeiDou-3 MEO satellites
2018/10/08Start of E33 signal transmission
2018/10/07Start of E15 signal transmission
2018/09/21Start of E36 signal transmission
2018/09/20Start of E13 signal transmission
2018/09/19Launch of two BeiDou-3 MEO satellites
2018/09/02Start of C25 and C26 signal transmission
2018/08/24Launch of two BeiDou-3 MEO satellites
2018/08/04Start of C23 and C24 signal transmission
2018/07/29Launch of two BeiDou-3 MEO satellites
2018/07/25Launch of four Galileo satellites
2018/07/09Launch of a BeiDou-2 IGSO satellite
2018/06/16Launch of a GLONASS-M satellite
2018/05/08Start of E27 signal transmission
2018/05/07Start of E31 signal transmission
2018/05/01Start of E21 signal transmission
2018/04/13Start of E25 signal transmission
2018/04/09Start of C29/C30 signal transmission
2018/04/11Launch of IRNSS-1I
2018/03/29Launch of two BeiDou-3 MEO satellites
2018/02/20Start of C21/C22 signal transmission
2018/02/19BeiDou Open Service Signal B3I ICD published
2018/02/12Launch of two BeiDou-3 MEO satellites
2018/01/26Start of C27 signal transmission
2018/01/21Start of C28 signal transmission
2018/01/12QZS-4 declared usable
2018/01/11Launch of two BeiDou-3 MEO satellites
2017/12/12Launch of four Galileo satellites
2017/11/20Dilssner F. (2017) A note on the yaw attitude modeling of BeiDou IGSO-6
2017/11/05Launch of two BeiDou-3 MEO satellites
2017/11/01Start of QZS-4 signal transmission
2017/10/09Launch of the fourth QZSS satellite MICHIBIKI-4
2017/10/06Galileo FOC satellite metadata published
2017/09/15Start of QZS-2 trial service
2017/09/10Start of QZS-3 signal transmission
2017/08/19Launch of the third QZSS satellite MICHIBIKI-3
2017/08/09Galileo FOC FM-13 declared "usable"
2017/08/01Galileo FOC FM-12 declared "usable"
2017/06/27Start of QZS-2 signal transmission
2017/06/01Launch of the second QZSS satellite MICHIBIKI-2
2017/05/29Galileo FOC FM-07/14 declared "usable"
2017/04/22Start of Galileo FOC FM-12/13 (E03/E04) signal transmission
2017/03/03Start of Galileo FOC FM-14 (E05) signal transmission
2017/03/02Start of Galileo FOC FM-07 (E07) signal transmission
2017/01/31IRNSS 1A clock failures
2017/01/19ESA: Galileo clock anomalies under investigation
2016/12/15Galileo initial open service declaration
2016/12/01Galileo FOC FM-10/11 declared "available"
2016/11/17Launch of Galileo FOC FM-07/12/13/14
2016/10/11PRN switch of BeiDou IGSO 6 from C15 to C13
2016/09/23Release of igs08_1915.atx including updated Galileo PCOs
2016/06/12Launch of BeiDou GEO 7.
2016/05/24Launch of Galileo FOC FM-10/11 satellites.
2016/04/29IRNSS renamed to NAVIC.
2016/04/28Launch of IRNSS-1G GEO satellite.
2016/03/29Launch of BeiDou IGSO 6.
2016/03/10Launch of IRNSS-1F GEO satellite.
2016/02/12MGEX status changed to Pilot Project by IGS Governing Board.
2016/02/01Launch of BeiDou M3-S.
2016/01/20Launch of IRNSS-1E IGSO satellite.
2015/12/17Launch of Galileo FOC FM-8/9 satellites.
2015/10/15New daily multi-GNSS differential code bias (DCB) product from CAS/IGG Wuhan.
2015/10/01Resumed provision of 5-constellation orbit and clock product from Wuhan University (starting 2014).
2015/09/29Launch of second BeiDou-3 IGSO satellite.
2015/09/11Launch of Galileo FOC FM-5/6 satellites.
2015/09/01Integration of MGEX stations into IGS network.
2015/08/05Release of RINEX Version 3.03.
2015/07/25Launch of first BeiDou-3 MEO satellites.
2015/07/21New IGS antenna phase center model igs08_1854.atx with Galileo, BeiDou, QZSS and NAVIC satellites (see IGS mail 7126).
2015/06/01QZSS added to GFZ multi-constellation orbit and clock product.
2015/03/30Launch of first BeiDou-3 IGSO satellite.
2015/03/28Launch of IRNSS-1D.
2015/03/27Launch of Galileo FOC FM-3/4 satellites.
2015/01/04Start use of ECOM2 solar radiation pressure model for CODE multi-GNSS orbit and clock product (week 1826).
2014/12/31Start of daily uploads for GPS L2C/L5 CNAV navigation data.
2014/10/16Launch of IRNSS-1C.
2014/08/22Launch of first pair of Galileo FOC satellites. Orbit injection failure.
2014/07/01Addition of 10 new stations in Asia-Pacific region by Geoscience Australia.
2014/06/27IGS Workshop, Pasadena. Recommendation to adopt GPS-style spacecraft axis conventions (+x to Sun hemisphere) for all GNSS satellites with yaw-steering attitude control mode (Galileo, QZSS, etc.) and to initiate a RINEX 3 transition plan.
2014/04/28Start of routine CNAV transmission on GPS Block IIR-M satellites (L2C) and IIF satellites (L2C and L5).
2014/04/04Launch of IRNSS-1B
2014/03/23New BeiDou orbit and clock products provided by Wuhan University and GFZ (see section Products)
2014/02/24New differential code bias (DCB) product (see section Products); updated Galileo and QZSS event lists.
2013/08/03Start of routine provision of JAXA's combined GPS+QZSS precise orbit and clock product for MGEX (see section Products)
2013/08/02Provision of GPS L2C/L5 CNAV data set from June 2013 campaign (see sections GPS Status Page)
2013/07/30RINEX files from 9 stations of the ESA/ESOC network are made available to the MGEX project including current and historic data (see MGEX station list).
2013/07/04Updated information on real-time streams and products (see sections Real-Time Data and Real-Time Products)
2013/07/01Launch of IRNSS-1; opened new section on Indian Regional Navigation Satellite System (IRNSS)
2013/05/29New multi-GNSS broadcast ephemeris product made available (see section Products)
2013/05/29Various new stations have been added to the MGEX network by CNES (REGINA network), DLR (CONGO network), and GFZ as well as individual providers (see section Network). A total of 74 stations is now available, most of which offer real-time data streams in addition to offline RINEX3 data.
2013/03/01All participating institutions have now transitionend to the RINEX3 format for observation and navigation files submitted to the MGEX data archives. RINEX2 has been discontinued for MGEX purposes (but continues to be used for the operational IGS network).
2012/12/17First release of QZSS products by JAXA (see section Products)
2012/11/10Provision of orbit and clock products for Galileo and QZSS (see section Products)
2012/11/10Revised interactive network map (see section Network)
2012/11/10Draft parameters for BeiDou processing (see BeiDou page)
2012/10/25Recommended parameters for Galileo and GIOVE processing (see Galileo page)
2012/10/25Recommended parameters for QZSS processing (see QZSS page)

GNSS Constellations

GPS

GPS
GLONASS

GLONASS
Galileo

Galileo
BeiDou

BeiDou
QZSS

QZSS
NAVIC

NAVIC
SBAS

SBAS
Status information and reference data for the various navigation satellite systems can be obtained by clicking on the icons above. Primary attention is given to the emerging constellations that are currently deployed and undergoing initial validation.

Network

Network

The current status of the global multi-GNSS network is shown on the IGS Network page along with supporting information from the site database. 
 

Data and Products

Data Products
Data Products

 

An overview of MGEX offline data holdings and real-time data streams is given on the Data section. For offline and real-time products, please refer to the Products section.

Referencing IGS and the MGEX Project

In accord with the overall policy of the IGS, all MGEX data and products are freely available for public use. To help IGS agencies justify funding requests, we request that users include a citation when use of IGS data or products results in a publication. For MGEX-related work, please reference

For general IGS data and products, please include a citation of

For specific MGEX products, links to recommended references are provided in the products table.

 

Contributing to MGEX

The Multi-GNSS Pilot Project encourages contributions to its overall goals by interested institutions and individuals. New contributions may cover data, products and analyses of all global and regional navigation satellite systems, but should complement existing MGEX capabilities and avoid redundancy. Specific areas of interest include support of NAVIC, 3rd generation BeiDou satllite signals, the combination and validation of multi-GNSS orbit and clock products, the characterization of the GNSS space segment (radiation pressure modeling, antenna calibrations, etc.), and the generation of real-time multi-GNSS products. Proposals for new contributions can be coordinated through the various members of the Multi-GNSS Working Group.

 

Last Updated: 2019/07/11 11:31:46

MGEX Data Holdings

The Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX) has been set-up by the IGS to track, collate and analyze all available GNSS signals. This includes signals from BeiDou, Galileo, QZSS, and IRNSS, as well as from modernized GPS and GLONASS satellites and any space-based augmentation system (SBAS) of interest. Analysis centers will attempt to estimate inter-system calibration biases, compare equipment performance and further develop processing software capable of handling multiple GNSS observation data.

Recent observation data of IGS Multi-GNSS stations in RINEX3 format are available from the IGS global data centers

The RINEX 3 file names comprise a 9-char station+country identification, an 11-digit start epoch, as well as two 3-char/digit fields indicating the nominal duration and sampling. By way of example, MAS100ESP_R_20142350000_01D_30S_MO.crx.gz denotes a RINEX 3 gzipped daily, Hatanaka compressed observation file with 30-s sampling for the IGS MAS1 station in Spain. A detailed specification of the new file naming scheme is provided as part of the RINEX3 Standard. RINEX 2 files that reside in the same directory follow the old “8.3” naming scheme, e.g., mas12350.14d.Z. The archives provide daily RINEX files at 30 s update rate as well as high-rate (1 Hz) files for selected stations. An overview of tracked satellites and supported observation types for all MGEX stations is provided in a dedicated RINEX Observation File Summary maintained by the Astronomical Institute of the University of Bern.

Historic Data

Provision of MGEX observation data started with dedicated MGEX project directories at the global data centers. In the frame of the RINEX transition plan the IGS pursued the integration of multi-GNSS observation and navigation data in RINEX3 format and RINEX2 data from legacy stations in 2015/2016. Historic MGEX observation files back to 2012 and for individual stations and days even back to 2010 are available from

  • Historic MGEX data at CDDIS
  • Historic MGEX data at IGN
  • Historic MGEX data at BKG

Notes

MGEX observation and navigation data are provided on a best-effort basis and may not offer the same level of consistency, quality and availability as legacy GPS/GLO data sets from the core IGS network. RINEX3 files in the MGEX repository may be generated

  • within the receiver,
  • from offline conversion of raw receiver data by the station provider using vendor-specific or proprietary offline tools, or
  • from RTCM3-MSM real-time data streams using BKG’s BNC software.

Furthermore, different generation methods may apply for daily and high-rate data files. Depending on the employed tool chain and software revisions, various deficiencies have occurred that affect past and/or current data in the MGEFX archive. Users cannot presently expect full consistency of all data and literal adherence to the RINEX3 standard. Known problems include

  • Inconsistency of implemented features and RINEX version number (3.01, 3.02, 3.03)
  • Absence of mandatory header lines (e.g. phase alignment information or GLONASS slot numbers)
  • Use of improper observation type designations (e.g., C5X instead of C5Q for pilot-only tracking of the L5/E5a signal)
  • Differences in observation values between data from RTCM3-MSM streams and unprocessed receiver data.
  • Inconsistent observation types for BeiDou B1 observations due to inconsistent definitions in recent RINEX versions (C2I in RINEX 3.01 and 3.03 vs. C1I in RINEX 3.02).

In addition, receiver-specific problems may result in a degraded measurement quality for some of the new signals and constellations.
While an effort is made to continuously improve the overall quality and consistency of the MGEX data in cooperation with all providers, the MGEX project relies on volunteers and can’t commit on fixing all problems on short notice. However, the feedback of all users is appreciated to document known issues and to share this information within the MGEX community.

Real-Time Data

Real-time data streams for a large fraction of MGEX stations are publicly available at the MGEX NTRIP caster of BKG. Information on accessing (or contributing) MGEX real-time streams is provided on the MGEX Real-time Streaming FAQ page of BKG.

Precise Orbit and Clock Products

Orbit and clock products that become available as part of the MGEX data analysis are made available at the CDDIS MGEX product archive (Earthdata login required) as well as mirror sites hosted by IGN and ENSG. The products are stored in weekly directories (identified by the 4-digit GPS week) and identified by a three letter analysis center ID identifying the contributing agency. Six MGEX analysis centers are presently contributing dedicated multi-GNSS products for MGEX on a routine basis:

  • Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales (CNES), Collecte Localisation Satellites (CLS), Groupe de Recherche de Géodésie Spatiale (GRGS)
  • Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE)
  • GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam (GFZ)
  • Shanghai Observatory (SHAO)
  • Technische Universität München (TUM)
  • Wuhan University

In addition, a copy of the QZSS final orbit and clock products generated by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) is made available to MGEX users on a courtesy basis.

First orbit and clock products for selected new constellations were provided by the MGEX Analysis Centers (ACs) in mid 2012 (GPS week 1680). Since then an increasing number of multi-constellation products covering up to five global or regional navigation satellite systems has become available. In addition to precise ephemerides, clock products with sampling intervals down to 30 s, Earth orientation parameters (EOPs), and biases are generated by individual ACs. Selected ACs also provide station coordinates and EOPs in the Solution INdependent EXchange (SINEX) format. An overview of products available as of June 2020 is provided in the following table.

Institution
ID
Constellations
Products
References
CNES/CLS GRG0MGXFIN GPS+GLO+GAL Satellite orbits and clocks (15 min; *.SP3)
Satellite and station clocks (30 s; *.CLK)
Site coordinates and EOPs (*.SNX)
Loyer et al. (2018)
CODE COD0MGXFIN GPS+GLO+GAL+BDS2+QZS Satellite orbits and clocks (5 min; *.SP3)
Satellite and station clocks (30 s/5 min; *.CLK)
Earth orientation parameters (12 h; *.ERP)
Biases (1 d; *.BIA)
Prange et al. (2020a),
Prange et al. (2020b)
GFZ GFZ0MGXRAP GPS+GLO+GAL+BDS2+QZS Satellite orbits and clocks (15 min; *.SP3)
Satellite and station clocks (30 s/5 min; *.CLK)
Earth orientation parameters (1 d; *.ERP)
Biases (1 d; *.BIA)
IGSMAIL-7748,
GFZ MGEX website
JAXA JAX0MGXFIN GPS+GLO+QZS Satellite orbits and clocks (5 min; *.SP3)
Satellite and station clocks (30 s; *.CLK)
Site coordinates and ERPs (*.SNX)
SHAO SHA0MGXRAP GPS+GLO+GAL+BDS2 Satellite orbits and clocks (15 min; *.SP3)
Satellite and station clocks (5 min; *.CLK)
TUM TUM0MGXRAP GAL+BDS2+QZS Satellite orbits and clocks (5 min; *.SP3) Selmke et al. (2018)
Wuhan Univ. WUM0MGXFIN GPS+GLO+GAL+BDS2+BDS3+QZS Satellite orbits and clocks (15 min; *.SP3)
Satellite and station clocks (5 min; *.CLK)
Earth orientation parameters (1 d; *.ERP)
Analysis strategy summary

Discontinued and former products with legacy file naming are listed below:

Institution
ID
Availability
References
CNES/CLS grm until week 2024 Loyer et al. (2016)
CODE com until week 1961 Prange et al. (2015)Prange et al. (2016)
GFZ gfm until week 1789 Uhlemann and Fritsche (2014)
GFZ gbm until week 2037 Deng et al. (2014)Uhlemann et al. (2015)
JAXA qzf until week 1938
TUM tum until week 2024
Wuhan Univ. wum until week 2033 Guo et al. (2016)

Antenna model

The current IGS antenna phase center model igs14.atx contains calibrations for all GPS, GLONASS, Galileo, BeiDou, QZSS, and IRNSS satellites. However, individual analysis centers partly use different satellite antenna phase center calibrations as given in the following table:

Analysis center GPS GLONASS Galileo BDS-2 BDS-3 QZSS Date
CNES/CLS igs14.atx igs14.atx igs14.atx n/a n/a n/a 09-Jun-2020
CODE igs14.atx igs14.atx Steigenberger et al. (2016) MGEX¹ n/a igs14.atx 09-Jun-2020
GFZ igs14.atx igs14.atx igs14.atx igs14.atx² n/a igs14.atx 08-Jun-2020
JAXA igs14.atx igs14.atx n/a n/a n/a ??
SHAO igs14.atx igs14.atx igs14.atx CSNO/TARC (2019)³ n/a n/a 10-Jun-2020
TUM n/a n/a ?? ?? n/a ??
Wuhan Univ. igs14.atx igs14.atx igs14.atx igs14.atx⁴ igs14.atx⁵ igs14.atx 09-Jun-2020
  1. Initial MGEX conventional PCOs (0.6 m/0.0 m/1.1 m)
  2. Dilssner et al. (2014) before 14-Jun-2020
  3. Guo et al. (2016) for MEO and IGSO satellites before 07-Feb-2020
  4. Guo et al. (2016) before 22-Sep-2019
  5. CNSO/TARC before 22-Sep-2019

Receiver antenna calibrations of igs14.atx are currently limited to the L1 and L2 band. Therefore, the missing E5/B3 calibrations are substituted by existing calibrations, usually GPS L2. Group delay variations of the transmit antennas are in particular pronounced for BDS-2 (Wanninger and Beer, 2014) but also present for GPS, Galileo, and GLONASS (Wanninger et al., 2017; Beer et al., 2019).

Analysis center Receiver antennas E5/B3 substitution Group delay variations
CNES/CLS igs14.atx GPS L2 not applied
CODE igs14.atx GPS L2 not applied
GFZ igs14.atx GPS L2 not applied
JAXA igs14.atx
SHAO igs14.atx GPS L2
TUM igs14.atx
Wuhan Univ. igs14.atx GPS L2 Wanninger and Beer (2014) for BDS-2
Beer S, Wanninger L, Heßelbarth A (2019) Galileo and GLONASS group delay variations. GPS Solutions 24:23, DOI: 10.1007/s10291-019-0939-7
CSNO/TARC (2019) Announcement on the release of Beidou satellite related parameters
Dilssner F, Springer T, Schönemann E, Enderle E (2014) Estimation of Satellite Antenna Phase Center Corrections for BeiDou, IGS Workshop 2014, Pasadena, USA
Guo J, Xu X, Zhao Q, Liu J (2016) Precise orbit determination for quad-constellation satellites at Wuhan University: strategy, result validation, and comparison, Journal of Geodesy 90(2):143-159. DOI: 10.1007/s00190-015-0862-9
Rebischung P, Schmid R (2016) IGS14/igs14.atx: a new framework for the IGS products, AGU Fall Meeting, San Francisco, USA
Steigenberger P, Fritsche M, Dach R, Schmid R, Montenbruck O, Uhlemann M, Prange L (2016) Estimation of satellite antenna phase center offsets for Galileo, Journal of Geodesy 90(8):773-785. DOI: 10.1007/s00190-016-0909-6
Wanninger L, Beer S (2014) BeiDou satellite-induced code pseudorange variations: diagnosis and therapy, GPS Solutions 19(4):639-648, DOI: 10.1007/s10291-014-0423-3
Wanninger L, Sumaya H, Beer S (2017) Group delay variations of GPS transmitting and receiving antennas, Journal of Geodesy 91(9):1099-1116, DOI: 10.1007/s00190-017-1012-3

File naming

File names of all MGEX products as well as the DCB products of CAS and DLR are based on a new naming scheme proposed for IGS products, which is inherited from the RINEX3 file naming convention and comprises five fields separated by underscores (“_”). The initial 10-char field specifies the analysis center (3-char), a version number (1-digit), the campaign/project (3-char) and a product type (3-char). The remaining fields provide the start epoch (11-digit year, day-of-year, hour, minute), the nominal product period (2-digit number and unit designator such as D (days), L (months), or Y (years)), the sampling interval (2-digit number and unit designator), and, finally, the product type (3-char).

MGEX file naming

  • Currently, only the version identifier 0 is used within MGEX
  • The project specification for MGEX is MGX.
  • Product types:
    • FIN: final analysis
    • RAP: rapid analysis
  • Content types:
    • CLK: receiver and/or satellite clock parameters
    • ERP: Earth rotation parameters
    • ORB: satellite orbits
    • OSB: observable-specific signal bias
    • SOL: variance/covariance information or normal equations
  • File formats:
  • Compression methods:
    • gz: gzip
    • Z: UNIX compress

Product quality

Orbit and clock analyses as well as SLR residuals based on the aforementioned MGEX products are posted on the MGEX Analysis section. The analyses are updated on a weekly basis. Further details on the quality of the MGEX products can be found in the following publications:

Guo F, Li X, Zhang X, Wang J (2017) Assessment of precise orbit and clock products for Galileo, BeiDou, and QZSS from IGS Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX), GPS Solutions 21:279-290, DOI 10.1007/s10291-016-0523-3
Steigenberger P, Montenbruck O (2019) Consistency of MGEX Orbit and Clock Products, Engineering, DOI 10.1016/j.eng.2019.12.005
Wang B, Chen J, Wang B (2019) Analysis of Galileo Clock Products of MGEX-ACs, 2019 European Navigation Conference (ENC), IEEE, DOI 10.1109/EURONAV.2019.8714186

Broadcast Ephemerides

In addition to the aforementioned precise orbit and clock products, combined multi-GNSS broadcast ephemeris files are made available by Bundesamt für Kartographie und Geodäsie (BKG), Institut Géographique National (IGN), IGS, and Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR).

Institution File name Constellations Notes
BKG BRDC00WRD_S_yyyydddhhmm_01D_MN.rnx.gz GPS+GLO+GAL+BDS+QZSS+SBAS Converted from stream RTCM3EPH on
http://mgex.igs-ip.net
IGN BRDC00IGN_R_yyyydddhhmm_01D_MN.rnx.gz GPS+GLO+GAL also files for GPS-only (GN), GLONASS-only (RN) and Galileo-only (EN)
IGS BRDC00IGS_R_yyyydddhhmm_01D_MN.rnx.gz GPS+GLO+GAL+BDS
+QZSS+SBAS
Merged from receiver-generated RINEX navigation files
DLR brdmdddn.yyp.Z GPS+GLO+GAL+BDS
+QZSS+IRNSS+SBAS
Merged from streams of about 35 stations, until Jan/2020
DLR BRDM00DLR_S_yyyyddd0000_01D_MN.rnx.gz GPS+GLO+GAL+BDS
+QZSS+IRNSS+SBAS
Merged from streams of about 35 stations, since 329/2019

The various broadcast ephemerides are provided in the form of RINEX3 navigation files:

  • The BRDM00DLR and BRDX00DLR product files are available in the annual archives of the CDDIS and the daily archives of IGN and BKG.
  • The IGN BRDC product is available in the daily data archives at IGN.
  • The IGS BRDC product is available in the annual data archives of CDDIS and the daily data archives at IGN.
  • BKG’s product can independently be obtained from the BKG BRDC archive, which also provides near-real-time version updated at 15 min intervals in a sliding window mode.

As a special product, MGEX offers daily sets of GPS CNAV data recorded from a global subset of MGEX stations. Details of the contents and format are provided in the CNAV section of the MGEX GPS status page.

Differential Code Biases

Proper knowledge of differential code biases (DCBs) is essential in many navigation applications but also non-navigation applications such as ionospheric analysis and time transfer. With the plethora of new signals offered by modernized and new GNSSs, the need for a comprehensive multi-GNSS DCB product arises.

As part of the IGS Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX) two different DCB products are presently provided by the Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics (IGG) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) in Wuhan and the German Aerospace Center (DLR) at the CDDIS and IGN product archives:

Institution Products Constellations and Signals Notes
CAS CAS0MGXRAP_yyyyddd0000_01D_01D_DCB.BSX.gz GPS(C1C,C1W,C2L/S/X,C2W,C5Q/X)
GLO(C1C,C1P,C2C,C2P)
GAL(C1C/X,C5Q/X,C6C,C7Q/X,C8Q/X)
BDS(C1X,C2I,C5D/P/X,C6I,C7I/Z,C8X)
QZS(C1C/X,C2L/X,C5Q/X)
Wang et al. 2016
DLR DLR0MGXFIN_yyyyddd0000_03L_07D_DCB.BSX.gz
DLR0MGXFIN_yyyyddd0000_03L_01D_DCB.BSX.gz
GPS(C1C,C1W,C2L/S/X,C2W,C5Q/X)
GPS(C1L,C1X) since Mar/2020
GLO(C1C,C1P,C2C,C2P)
GAL(C1C/X,C5Q/X,C7Q/X,C8Q/X)
GAL(C6C) since Q2/2017
BDS(C2I,C6I,C7I)
BDS(C5X) since Jan/2019
BDS(C1X) since Mar/2019
BDS(C7Z) since Aug/2019
QZS(C1C/X,C2L/S/X,C5Q/X) since Q3/2017
Montenbruck et al. 2014

The DCBs are derived from ionosphere-corrected pseudorange differences and cover all available signals of GPS, GLONASS, Galileo, and BeiDou. No DCBs are presently provided for QZSS, since the availability of only one spacecraft and the lack of a calibrated reference station do not allow a separation of satellite and station-specific DCBs.

Both DCB products offer continuous data since Jan. 1, 2013 but differ in the coverage and update rate. The satellite and station biases computed by the CAS are generated on a daily basis with a latency of 2-3 days and made available in daily BSX files. The DLR product is updated on a 3-monthly basis and comprises weekly averages of the satellite biases. In addition a full set of daily satellite AND station biases is provided for reference purposes and trend analyses. Note that station DCBs are not required in common positioning applications where they will typically be absorbed in clock offsets or inter-system biases.

Real-Time Products

Complementary to the multi-GNSS observation data provided in the real-time streams of individual MGEX stations, a distinct broadcast ephemeris stream (RTCM3EPH) is made available at the IGS-IP products caster. The stream is combined from a broadcast ephemerides delivered by a globally distributed set of stations and covers the complete GPS, GLONASS and Galileo constellation. For further information and alternative broadcast

Last Updated: 2020/06/22 06:05:51

Satellite Metadata

Satellite metadata are vital for accurate modeling of GNSS data. These include unique identifiers like SVN, COSPAR ID, Satellite Catalog Number (NORAD ID); PRN/SVN mapping; SVN/frequency channel mapping for GLONASS; satellite mass; center of mass; transmit antenna and laser retroreflector array eccentricities; and transmit power. More details on this topic are given in the IGS white paper on satellite and operations information for generation of precise GNSS orbit and clock products.

Metadata for GalileoQZSS, and BeiDou have already been published by the European GNSS Service Center, the Cabinet Office (CAO), Government of Japan and the China Satellite Navigation Office (CSNO). CAO also provides operational history information including orbit maintenance maneuvers and attitude switches.

In order to be able to store and exchange the GNSS satellite metadata in a standardized format, an extension of the solution independent exchange (SINEX) format.

CAVE:

  • releases prior to igs_metadata_2031.snx had an erroneous width of the frequency channel number (A4 instead of A3).
  • different types of BDS-3 SECM satellites (A/B) have been introduced in release 2110.

References

Cabinet Office (2017a) QZS-1 satellite information. Tech. Rep. SPI_QZS1, Government of Japan, National Space Policy Secretariat, URL https://qzss.go.jp/en/technical/qzssinfo/khp0mf0000000wuf-att/spi-qzs1_a.pdf
Cabinet Office (2018a) QZS-2 satellite information. Tech. Rep. SPI-QZS2_B, Government of Japan, National Space Policy Secretariat, URL http://qzss.go.jp/en/technical/qzssinfo/khp0mf0000000wuf-att/spi-qzs2_c.pdf
Cabinet Office (2018b) QZS-3 satellite information. Tech. Rep. SPI-QZS3_A, Government of Japan, National Space Policy Secretariat, URL http://qzss.go.jp/en/technical/qzssinfo/khp0mf0000000wuf-att/spi-qzs3_b.pdf
Cabinet Office (2018c) QZS-4 satellite information. Tech. Rep. SPI-QZS4_B, Government of Japan, National Space Policy Secretariat, URL http://qzss.go.jp/en/technical/qzssinfo/khp0mf0000000wuf-att/spi-qzs4_c.pdf
Cabinet Office (2018d) The history information of QZS-1 operation. Tech. Rep. OHI-QZS1, Government of Japan, National Space Policy Secretariat, URL http://qzss.go.jp/en/technical/qzssinfo/khp0mf0000000wuf-att/ohi-qzs1_1_1.pdf
Cabinet Office (2018e) The history information of QZS-2 operation. Tech. Rep. OHI-QZS2, Government of Japan, National Space Policy Secretariat, URL http://qzss.go.jp/en/technical/qzssinfo/khp0mf0000000wuf-att/ohi-qzs2_1.pdf
Cabinet Office (2018f) The history information of QZS-3 operation. Tech. Rep. OHI-QZS3, Government of Japan, National Space Policy Secretariat, URL http://qzss.go.jp/en/technical/qzssinfo/khp0mf0000000wuf-att/ohi-qzs3_20190802.pdf
Cabinet Office (2018g) The history information of QZS-4 operation. Tech. Rep. OHI-QZS4, Government of Japan, National Space Policy Secretariat, URL http://qzss.go.jp/en/technical/qzssinfo/khp0mf0000000wuf-att/ohi-qzs4_20190802.pdf
Czopek F, Shollenberger S (1993) Description and performance of the GPS Block I and II L-band antenna and link budget. In: Proceedings of ION GPS 1993, Salt Lake City, UT, pp 37-43
Fatkulin R, Kossenko V, Storozhev S, Zvonar V, Chebotarev V (2012) Glonass space segment: satellite constellation, Glonass-M and Glonass-K spacecraft main features. In: ION GNSS 2012, Nashville, TN, pp 3912-3930
Hegarty C (2017) The Global Positioning System (GPS). In: Teunissen P, Montenbruck O (eds) Springer Handbook of Global Navigation Satellite Systems, Springer, chap 7, pp 197-218, DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-42928-1_7
Kramer HJ (2002) Observation of the Earth and Its Environment: Survey of Missions and Sensors, 4th edn. Springer, DOI 10.1007/978-3-642-56294-5
Montenbruck O, Schmid R, Mercier F, Steigenberger P, Noll C, Fatkulin R, Kogure S, Ganeshan A (2015) GNSS satellite geometry and attitude models. Advances in Space Research 56(6):1015-1029, DOI 10.1016/j.asr.2015.06.019
Revnivykh S, Bolkunov A, Serdyukov A, Montenbruck O (2017) GLONASS. In: Teunissen P, Montenbruck O (eds) Springer Handbook of Global Navigation Satellite Systems, Springer, chap 8, pp 219-245, DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-42928-1_8
Sosnica K, Thaller D, Dach R, Steigenberger P, Beutler G, Arnold D, Jäggi A (2015) Satellite laser ranging to GPS and GLONASS. Journal of Geodesy 89(7):725-743, DOI 10.1007/s00190-015-0810-8
Steigenberger P, Thoelert S, Montenbruck O (2018) GNSS satellite transmit power and its impact on orbit determination. Journal of Geodesy 92(6):609-624, DOI 10.1007/s00190-017-1082-2
Xu X, Li M, Li W, Liu J (2018) Performance analysis of BeiDou-2/BeiDou-3e combined solution with emphasis on precise orbit determination and precise point positioning. Sensors 18(1):135, DOI 10.3390/s18010135
Zandbergen R, Navarro D (2008) Specification of Galileo and GIOVE space segment properties relevant for satellite laser ranging. Tech. Rep. ESA-EUING-TN/10206, iss. 3.2, 08/05/2008, ESA/ESOC, Darmstadt
Zhao Q, Wang C, Guo J, Wang B, Liu J (2018) Precise orbit and clock determination for BeiDou-3 experimental satellites with yaw attitude analysis. GPS Solutions 22:4, DOI 10.1007/s10291-017-0673-y

 

Last Updated: 2020/07/14 10:11:04

Satellite Metadata SINEX Format

Satellite metadata are grouped in different blocks of the SINEX format:

Name Description
SATELLITE/IDENTIFIER Satellite designations (static)
SATELLITE/PRN PRN assignment
SATELLITE/FREQUENCY_CHANNEL GLONASS frequency channel
SATELLITE/MASS Spacecraft mass
SATELLITE/CENTER_OF_MASS Center-of-mass position
SATELLITE/ECCENTRICITY Equipment positions
SATELLITE/TX_POWER Transmit power

 

The space vehicle number (SVN) is used as primary key for specification of satellite metadata. Validity intervals are provided for time varying data including half-open intervals [tstart,tend[ and constant parameter values in each interval (no slopes). Like in the bias SINEX format, four digit years for time stamps are used. The comment field offers improved traceability and the FILE/COMMENT block is used for references and background information.

Satellite Identifier

The SATELLITE/IDENTIFIER block contains only unique information that does not require a validity interval. It supersedes the existing SATELLITE/ID block: the time-dependent PRN assignment has been moved to the new SATELLITE/PRN block, Satellite Catalog Numbers (aka NORAD-ID) and a comment field have been added, and new block names have been defined (old block names denote ANTEX antenna type!). The comment field contains the launch date and common name of the satellite if available.

Satellite PRN Assignment

The SATELLITE/PRN block supersedes the existing SATELLITE/ID block. It only contains the mapping between pseudo-random noise (PRN) number and space vehicle number (SVN).

GLONASS Frequency Channel

The SATELLITE/FREQUENCY_CHANNEL block provides the mapping between SVN and frequency channels of the GLONASS frequency devision multiple access (FDMA) technology.

Satellite Mass

A mass history is currently provided for selected Galileo and all QZSS satellites.

Satellite Center of Mass

The values refer to agreed-upon origin (e.g., origin of mechanical reference system defined by manufacturer). The use of zero values if no CoM location is available is possible but deprecated.

Satellite Eccentricity

The SATELLITE/ECCENTRICITY block provides equipment locations for use in measurement modeling (antennas, retro-reflectors, etc.). The values refer to an agreed-upon origin (e.g., origin of mechanical reference system defined by manufacturer) and IGS conventions for orientation of spacecraft body axes. The same origin applies for all devices and the center-of-mass of a given satellite. Users and providers are responsible to ensure the consistency of SATELLITE/ECCENTRICITY and SATELLITE/COM blocks.

Old and new PCO concept

Current ANTEX conventions imply the use of the center-of-mass as “reference point” for GNSS antennas (old in the above figure). This convention must be retained for SINEX up to the release of new ANTEX format. The definition of block-specific antenna reference points is encouraged for all GNSSs (new in the above figure). These are already available for Galileo IOV and FOC. The GNSS antenna names in the current IGS metadata SINEX file must match those in rcv_ant.tab for consistency with the current ANTEX file. New names should be defined when transitioning to mechanically defined antenna reference points. A list of old and new GNSS device names is given below. CAVE: Antenna names are different from block names! In version 1.4 of the ANTEX format, there are no entries for multiple L-band antennas as already employed on, e.g. GLO-K1 (R801) and QZSS.

Current (ANTEX 1.4 compatible)
Future (antenna and LRA reference points)

The technique-specific observation type indicator (T) is P for GNSS and L for SLR. Current SLR eccentricities refer to the “phase center”. This has to be replaced by the reference point for use with nadir-angle dependent range correction.

Satellite Transmit Power

Satellite transmit power is needed for the computation of antenna thrust. The transmit power values for QZSS are provided by the manufacturer, whereas the other values originate from high-gain antenna measurements.

Block and Device Names

GNSS block and device names

The old GNSS device names are compatible with the current ANTEX file. New device names are proposed along with a new version of the ANTEX format to support multiple GNSS antennas on a single GNSS satellite like GLO_K1A and the different QZSS satellites.

Block Device Name
GNSS old
Device Name
GNSS new
Description
GPS-I BLOCK I LANT_GPS_I GPS Block I
GPS-II BLOCK II LANT_GPS_II GPS Block II
GPS-IIA BLOCK IIA LANT_GPS_IIA GPS Block IIA
GPS-IIR-A BLOCK IIR-A LANT_GPS_IIR-A GPS Block IIR (original antenna)
GPS-IIR-B BLOCK IIR-B LANT_GPS_IIR-B GPS Block IIR (new antenna)
GPS-IIR-M BLOCK IIR-M LANT_GPS_IIR-M GPS Block IIR-M
GPS-IIF BLOCK IIF LANT_GPS_IIF GPS Block IIF
GPS-III BLOCK IIIA LANT_GPS_III GPS Block III
GLO GLONASS LANT_GLO GLONASS
GLO-M GLONASS-M LANT_GLO_M GLONASS-M+
GLO-M+ GLONASS-M LANT_GLO_M+ GLONASS-M
GLO-K1A GLONASS-K1 LANT_GLO_K1A GLONASS-K1
L3ANT_GLO_K1A
GLO-K1B GLONASS-K1 LANT_GLO_K1B GLONASS-K1
GAL-0A GALILEO-0A LANT_GIOVEA GIOVE-A
GAL-0B GALILEO-0B LANT_GIOVEB GIOVE-B
GAL-1 GALILEO-1 LANT_GAL_1 Galileo IOV
GAL-2 GALILEO-2 LANT_GAL_2 Galileo FOC
BDS-2M BEIDOU-2M LANT_BDS_2M BeiDou-2 MEO
BDS-2I BEIDOU-2I LANT_BDS_2I BeiDou-2 IGSO
BDS-2G BEIDOU-2G LANT_BDS_2G BeiDou-2 GEO
BDS-3SI-CAST BEIDOU-3SI-CAST LANT_BDS_3SI_CAST BeiDou-3 experimental IGSO, CAST
BDS-3SI-SECM BEIDOU-3SI-SECM LANT_BDS_3SI_SECM BeiDou-3 experimental IGSO, CAS
BDS-3SM-CAST BEIDOU-3SM-CAST LANT_BDS_3SM_CAST BeiDou-3 experimental MEO, CAST
BDS-3SM-SECM BEIDOU-3SM-SECM LANT_BDS_3SM_SECM BeiDou-3 experimental MEO, CAS
BDS-3M-CAST BEIDOU-3M-CAST LANT_BDS_3M_CAST BeiDou-3 MEO, CAST
BDS-3M-SECM-A BEIDOU-3M-SECM LANT_BDS_3M_SECM_A BeiDou-3 MEO, SECM (original bus)
BDS-3M-SECM-B LANT_BDS_3M_SECM_B BeiDou-3 MEO, SECM (new bus)
BDS-3G BEIDOU-3G LANT_BDS_3G BeiDou-3 GEO
BDS-3I BEIDOU-3I LANT_BDS_3I BeiDou-3 IGSO
QZS-1 QZSS LANT_QZS_1 QZSS Block I
L1SANT_QZS_1
QZS-2I QZSS-2I LANT_QZS_2I QZSS Block II IGSO
L1SANT_QZS_2I
L5SANT_QZS_2I
QZS-2G QZSS-2G LANT_QZS_2G QZSS Block II GEO
L1SANT_QZS_2G
L5SANT_QZS_2G
IRS-1I IRNSS-1I LANT_IRNSS_1I NAVIC IGSO
IRS-1G IRNSS-1G LANT_IRNSS_1G NAVIC GEO

 

SLR retroreflector device names
LRA name Description
LRA_GPS_IIA GPS IIA satellites
LRA_GPS_IIIF GPS IIIF satellites
LRA_GLO_396_AL GLONASS sats, 396 prisms (irreg. planar, Al coating)
LRA_GLO_132_AL GLONASS sats, 132 prisms (irreg. circle, Al coating)
LRA_GLO_M_AL GLONASS-M sats, 112 prisms and Al coating
LRA_GLO_M GLONASS-M sats, 112 prisms (uncoated)
LRA_GLO_K1 GLONASS-K1 sats, 123 prisms (ring array, uncoated?)
LRA_GIOVEA GIOVE-A LRA, 76 prisms
LRA_GIOVEB GIOVE-B LRA, 67 prisms
LRA_GAL_1 Galileo IOV satellites, 84 prisms
LRA_GAL_2 Galileo FOC satellites, 60 prisms
LRA_BDS_2M BeiDou-2 MEO satellites, 42 prisms
LRA_BDS_2GI BeiDou-2 GEO and IGSO satellites, 90 prisms
LRA_BDS_3SM BeiDou-3S MEO satellites (same as BDS_2M?)
LRA_BDS_3SI BeiDou-3S IGSO satellites (same as BDS_2GI?)
LRA_BDS_3M BeiDou-3 MEO satellites (same as BDS_3M?)
LRA_BDS_3GI BeiDou-3 GEO and IGSO satellites (same as BDS_2GI?)
LRA_QZSS_1 QZS-1 (QZSS Block I) satellite, 56 prisms (uncoated)
LRA_QZSS_2 QZS-2 (QZSS Block II GEO & IGSO), 56 prisms (coated)
LRA_IRNSS IRNSS satellites, 40 prisms

Constellations

Status information and reference data for the various navigation satellite systems can be obtained below. Primary attention is given to the emerging constellations that are currently deployed and undergoing initial validation.

GPS

Information on the current status of the GPS constellation is available on the web sites of the US Coast Guard and the United States Naval Observatory.

A graphical constellation chart along with a status table is maintained by the University of New Brunswick.Current updates on the service availability of individual satellites are provided in Notice Advisory to Navstar Users (NANU) messages, which are likewise available from the US Coast Guard.

CNAV

Between June 15 and 29, 2013, the GPS Directorate conducted a first live transmission of CNAV navigation messages as described in the L2C L5 CNAV Test Plan. The test involved all fully operational Block IIR-M and IIF satellites transmitting L2C and, in part, L5 signals.

As part of the MGEX project, CNAV navigation data were collected during this campaign by the German Aerospace Center (DLR) and the University of New Brunswick (UNB) with a total of five globally distributed multi-GNSS monitoring stations. The binary raw data as well as post-processed RINEX-style navigation files are made publicly available through the CDDIS and can be accessed in the June 2013 CNAV campaign direcory. A detailed description of the data set is provided in a dedicated ReadMe file.

The routine transmission of CNAV data started on April 28, 2014 and daily uploads of navigation data are performed since Dec. 31, 2014. CNAV data collected since the start of the pre-operational CNAV are made available on a daily basis in annual directories of the MGEX data archive at CDDIS for 2014 to 2019. Starting with day of year 329/2019, the CNAV files are provided with long RINEX 3 file names in the operational directories for merged navigation files at CDDIS, e.g., https://cddis.nasa.gov/archive/gnss/data/daily/2019/brdc/BRDX00DLR_S_20193290000_01D_MN.rnx.gz.

Institution File name Constellations Notes
DLR brdxdddn.yyx.Z GPS+QZSS CNAV+LNAV, until Jan/2020
DLR BRDX00DLR_S_yyyyddd0000_01D_MN.rnx.gz GPS+QZSS CNAV+LNAV, since 322/2019

 

The employed data format matches the one introduced for the CNAV test campaign and is described in the corresponding ReadMe file and Steigenberger et al. (2015).

Further reading:

Flex Power

Flex power denotes the redistribution of transmit power between different GNSS signal components. The changes in power are visible in the carrier-to-noise density ratio (C/N0) of geodetic GNSS receivers. Steigenberger et al. (2019) discuss three different modes of flex power. In addition, three new modes could be observed in 2020:

Mode IV V VI
Blocks IIR-M + IIF IIR-M + IIF IIR-M + IIF
Time frame 45/2020 – 103/2020 104 – 124/2020, since 130/2020 125 – 129/2020
Geogr. distr. center at 37°E/35°N and 69°E/35°N like mode IV + southswards ext. like mode V but “rectangular”
L1 C/A
L1 P(Y) +6 dB +9-11 dB +9-11 dB
L2 P(Y) +5 dB

 

The following plots show the activation areas of flex power modes IV, V, and VI obtained from carrier-to-noise density ratio analysis. Different colors indicate the groundtracks of individual satelliteswith increased carrier-to-noise density ratio.

Mode IVFig. 1 Flex power mode IV on February 14, 2020.
Mode VFig. 2 Flex power mode V on April 14, 2020.
Mode VIFig. 3 Flex power mode VI on May 06, 2020.

 

Further reading:

GLONASS

Information on the current status of the GLONASS constellation is provided by the GLONASS Information Centre, which also provides dedicated Notice Advisory to GLONASS Users messages.

A graphical constellation chart along with a status table is maintained by the University of New Brunswick.

 

Last Updated: 2017/12/01 07:54:27

Galileo

This page provides an overview of the Satellites in the Galileo Constellation. Technical parameters of the individual satellites and related conventions applied within the MGEX project are summarized in the Spacecraft Characteristics section. Furthermore, a list of Events of interest for the Galileo data processing is given. Information on the GIOVE satellites is given on a separate tab.

Satellites
Common Name
SVN
Int. Sat. ID
NORAD ID
NORAD Name
PRN
Notes
IOV-1, Galileo PFM E101 2011-060A 37846 GALILEO-PFM E11 Slot B05
IOV-2, Galileo FM2 E102 2011-060B 37847 GALILEO-FM2 E12 Slot B06
IOV-3, Galileo FM3 E103 2012-055A 38857 GALILEO-FM3 E19 Slot C04
IOV-4, Galileo FM4 E104 2012-055B 38858 GALILEO-FM4 E20 Slot C05
FOC-1 E201 2014-050A 40128 GALILEO 5 (261) E18 Orbit injection failure (i=49.7° e=0.23)
FOC-2 E202 2014-050B 40129 GALILEO 6 (262) E14 Orbit injection failure (i=49.7° e=0.23)
FOC-3 E203 2015-017A 40544 GALILEO 7 (263) E26 Slot B08
FOC-4 E204 2015-017B 40545 GALILEO 8 (264) E22 Slot B03
FOC-5 E205 2015-045A 40889 GALILEO 9 (205) E24 Slot A08
FOC-6 E206 2015-045B 40890 GALILEO 10 (206) E30 Slot A05
FOC-8 E208 2015-079B 41174 GALILEO 12 (269) E08 Slot C07
FOC-9 E209 2015-079A 41175 GALILEO 11 (268) E09 Slot C02
FOC-10 E210 2016-030B 41550 GALILEO 13 (26A) E01 Slot A02
FOC-11 E211 2016-030A 41549 GALILEO 14 (26B) E02 Slot A06
FOC-7 E207 2016-069A 41859 GALILEO 15 (267) E07 Slot C06
FOC-12 E212 2016-069B 41860 GALILEO 16 (26C) E03 Slot C08
FOC-13 E213 2016-069C 41861 GALILEO 17 (26D) E04 Slot C03
FOC-14 E214 2016-069D 41862 GALILEO 18 (26E) E05 Slot C01
FOC-15 E215 2017-079A 43055 GALILEO 19 (2C5) E21 Slot A03
FOC-16 E216 2017-079B 43056 GALILEO 20 (2C6) E25 Slot A07
FOC-17 E217 2017-079C 43057 GALILEO 21 (2C7) E27 Slot A04
FOC-18 E218 2017-079D 43058 GALILEO 22 (2C8) E31 Slot A01
FOC-19 E219 2018-060C 43566 GALILEO 23 (2C9) E36 Slot B04
FOC-20 E220 2018-060D 43567 GALILEO 24 (2C0) E13 Slot B01
FOC-21 E221 2018-060A 43564 GALILEO 25 (2C1) E15 Slot B02
FOC-22 E222 2018-060B 43565 GALILEO 26 (2C2) E33 Slot B07

 

Spacecraft Characteristics

Metadata for Galileo IOV and FOC satellites including attitude law, mass, center of mass, satellite antenna PCOs and PCVs, geometry and optical properties, as well as satellite group delays are provided by the European GNSS Service Center. Additional information on the FOC satellites is given in the OHB Galileo Space Segment Brochure.

Parameter
IOV
FOC
Launch mass 700 kg 733 kg
Body size 2.61 m x 1.15 m x 1.15 m 2.53 m x 1.20 m x 1.10 m
Solar array size 2 x 2 x 2.5 m x 1.1 m 2 x 2 x 2.5 m x 1.1 m
Span width 14.5 m 14.7 m
SRP acceleration 113 nm/s2 107 nm/s2 (FOC-1/2)
114 nm/s2 (others)

 

The Galileo-IOV/FOC spacecraft are equipped with broadband GNSS antennas for the E1, E5ab and E6 frequency bands and with a laser retroreflector array (LRA) for satellite laser ranging.

 

IOV
FOC

 

Fig. 1 Spacecraft reference system and sensor location for the Galileo IOV (left), and Galileo FOC (right) satellites. Blue arrows and labels indicate the reference system adopted by the IGS, while the manufacturer-specific systems are illustrated in red. During nominal yaw-steering, the Sun is always confined to the +xIGS-hemisphere. Reproduced from DOI 10.1016/j.asr.2015.06.019 with permission of Elsevier; satellite images courtesy ESA.

Satellite Antenna Phase Center

Phase center offsets (PCOs) and variations (PCVs) of the GNSS antenna of the Galileo IOV and FOC satellites were published by the European GNSS Service Center in in December 2016 and October 2017, respectively. These PCOs and PCVs for the are included in the IGS14 ANTEX file since GPS week 1972 for the IOV satellites and week 1986 for the FOC satellites.

All values refer to the IGS-specific spacecraft coordinate system illustrated in blue in Fig. 1. The spacecraft coordinate system is aligned with the main body axes and originates near the anti-Earth panel. By convention of the IGS

  • the +zIGS-axis is oriented along the boresight direction of the antenna,
  • the yIGS-axis is parallel to the rotation axis of the solar panels and the positive yIGS-direction is defined through the adopted +xIGS-direction,
  • the +xIGS-axis completes a right handed system and is chosen such that the Sun is always located in the +xIGS hemisphere during nominal yaw-steering.

The detailed orientation of the +xIGS and +yIGS-axes for individual satellites is defined as shown in the drawings.Due to an initial lack of publicly available measured antenna phase center offsets conventional values of (x,y,z)IGS=(-0.2 m, 0.0 m, +0.6 m) and (x,y,z)IGS=(+0.15 m, 0.0 m, +1.0 m) were recommended for orbit and clock determination of the Galileo-IOV and -FOC satellites, respectively, until GPS week 1914. These values provided a first estimate of the actual phase center relative to the center of mass based on the images and models or coarse phase center estimates.

In 2016, GFZ and DLR estimated PCOs for the Galileo IOV and FOC satellites based on the ionosphere-free linear combination of E1 and E5a [4]. These values are included in igs08.atx since GPS week 1915 [5]. The switch dates of the individual ACs are given in the following table:

Analysis center com gbm grm tum wum
Switch date 262/2016 269/2016 262/2016 268/2016 n/a
LRA Coordinates

For the modeling of satellite laser ranging measurements nominal coordinates of the effective LRA reflection point have been specified by ESA as part of the ILRS mission support request, see [1].

Attitude

Similar to the GPS satellites, the attitude of the Galileo satellites is actively controlled to orient the +zIGS axis towards the Earth. At the same time the spacecraft is continuously rotated about this axis to maintain the yIGS-axis perpendicular to the plane made up by the Sun, Earth, and satellite. The +xIGS-panel is always sunlit, while the -xIGS-panel is oriented towards “deep space”. Details of the IOV attitude control during noon- and midnight turns in periods when the Sun is close to the orbital plane are described in [3] although differing from the information published on the GSA webpage.

Transmit Power

Transmit power of GNSS satellites is required for the computation of antenna thrust. The equivalent isotropic radiation power (EIRP) was measured by DLR with its 30 m dish antenna. Values between 95 and 160 W were obtained for the IOV satellites for different time periods. The FOC satellites have a significantly higher mean transmit power of 265 W, for details see [6].

References

[1] Galileo-101 and -102 ILRS SLR Mission Support Request Form (2011/06)
[2] ILRS Galileo IOV Center of Mass Information
[3] Konrad A., Fischer H.-D., Müller C., Oesterlin W. (2007) “Attitude & orbit control system for Galileo IOV”; 17th IFAC Symposium on Automatic Control in Aerospace, DOI 10.3182/20070625-5-FR-2916.00006
[4] Steigenberger P., Fritsche M., Dach R., Schmid R., Montenbruck O., Uhlemann M., Prange L. (2016) “Estimation of satellite antenna phase center offsets for Galileo”, Journal of Geodesy 90(8):773-785, DOI 10.1007/s00190-016-0909-6
[5] Schmid R. “igs08_1915.atx: Updated phase center offsets for Galileo satellites”, IGSMAIL-7356
[6] Steigenberger P., Thoelert S., Montenbruck O. (2018) “GNSS Satellite Transmit Power and its Impact on Orbit Determination”, Journal of Geodesy 92(6): 609-624, DOI 10.1007/s00190-017-1082-2

 

Events

 

DateUTCSatellitePRNDescriptionNotes
2018/06/20MorningFOC-17E27Start of broadcast message transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2018/06/19MorningFOC-18E31Start of broadcast message transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2018/06/05MorningFOC-16E25Start of broadcast message transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2018/05/08FOC-17E27Start of signal transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2018/05/07FOC-18E31Start of signal transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2018/05/01FOC-15E21Start of signal transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2018/04/13NoonFOC-16E25Start of signal transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2017/12/08MorningFOC-4E22Start of transmission outage due to constellation managementCONGO/MGEX monitoring, NAGU 2017045
2017/06/16NoonFOC-6E30Short transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring, NAGU 2017023
2017/05/3013:15FOC-14E05Satellite declared usableNAGU 2017017
2017/05/2918:23FOC-7E07Satellite declared usableNAGU 2017018
2017/05/1612:44ALLALLNavigation messages refreshed for all satellitesNAGU 2017016
2017/05/1415:50ALLALLNavigation messages not refreshed for all satellitesNAGU 2017015
2017/05/04MorningFOC-12E03End of transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2017/05/03EveningFOC-12E03Start of transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2017/05/02MorningFOC-13E04End of transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2017/05/01MorningFOC-12E03Restart of signal transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2017/05/01MorningFOC-12E03Short transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2017/05/01EveningFOC-13E04Start of transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2017/04/29MorningFOC-13E04Restart of signal transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2017/04/29MorningFOC-13E04Short transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2017/04/25AfternoonFOC-13E04End of signal transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2017/04/24EveningFOC-12E03End of signal transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2017/04/22MorningFOC-12E03Start of E1 and E5 signal transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2017/04/22EveningFOC-13E04Start of E1 and E5 signal transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2017/04/055:50FOC-14E05Start of broacast message transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2017/03/288:40FOC-7E07Start of broacast message transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2017/03/21MorningFOC-7E07Few hours transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2017/03/19MorningFOC-14E05Few hours transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2017/03/12MorningFOC-14E05Restart of signal transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2017/03/11MorningFOC-7E07Restart of signal transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2017/03/06MorningFOC-7E07End of signal transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2017/03/06NoonFOC-14E05End of signal transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2017/03/05MorningFOC-4E24End of transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring, NAGU 2017007
2017/03/039:44FOC-14E05Start of E1 and E5 signal transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2017/03/0210:40FOC-7E07Start of E1 and E5 signal transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2017/03/01AfternoonFOC-5E24Start of transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring, NAGU 2017006
2016/12/30EveningFOC-5E24End of transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring, NAGU 2017001
2016/12/28NoonFOC-5E24Start of transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring, NAGU 2016077
2016/10/21EveningIOV-02E12End of transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring, NAGU 2016045
2016/10/1413:00FOC-10E01Start of broadcast message transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2016/10/1317:20FOC-11E02Start of broadcast message transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2016/10/12MorningIOV-02E12Start of transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2016/10/02MorningFOC-11E02Restart of signal transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2016/10/01MorningFOC-10E01Restart of signal transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2016/09/12MorningFOC-10E01Start of transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2016/09/12MorningFOC-11E02Start of transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2016/09/06MorningFOC-10E01End of transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2016/09/05MorningFOC-11E02Few hours transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2016/09/05Late eveningFOC-10E01Start of transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2016/08/31Early morningFOC-10E01End of transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2016/08/31Late eveningFOC-11E02End of transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2016/08/24MorningFOC-11E02Start of transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2016/08/22MorningFOC-11E02Few hours transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2016/08/21NoonFOC-10E01Start of transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2016/08/20MorningFOC-11E02Start of signal transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2016/08/18MorningFOC-10E01Few hours transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2016/08/17MorningFOC-10E01Start of signal transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2016/08/10AfternoonFOC-8E08Few hours transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring, NAGU 2016038
2016/08/08NoonFOC-9E09Few hours transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring, NAGU 2016037
2016/08/0419:20FOC-1E18Start of broadcast message transmission for test purposesCONGO/MGEX monitoring, announced for 2016/08/05 Midnight by NAGU 2016029
2016/08/0420:00FOC-2E14Start of broadcast message transmission for test purposesCONGO/MGEX monitoring, announced for 2016/08/05 Midnight by NAGU 2016030
2016/08/02NoonFOC-6E30Few hours transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring, NAGU 2016034
2016/08/01AfternoonFOC-5E24Few hours transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring, NAGU 2016032
2016/08/01Late eveningFOC-4E22End of transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring, NAGU 2016032
2016/07/25AfternoonFOC-3E26Few hours transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring, NAGU 2016023
2016/07/25EveningFOC-4E22Start of transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring, NAGUs 2016022, 2016024
2016/07/21NoonFOC-1E18Few hours transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2016/07/19NoonFOC-2E14short transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2016/07/01AfternoonFOC-1E18Restart of signal transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2016/06/16AfternoonFOC-1E18Start of transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2016/05/15AfternoonIOV-1E11Short transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring, NAGUs 2016009, 2016010
2016/04/22FOC-8E08Satellite declared availableNAGU 2016007
2016/04/22FOC-9E09Satellite declared availableNAGU 2016008
2016/03/21AfternoonIOV-3E19Restart of signal transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2016/03/20NoonIOV-3E19Short signal transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2016/03/17EveningFOC-5E24Restart of signal transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring, NAGU 2016005
2016/03/15AfternoonIOV-3E19Start of transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring, NAGU 2016004
2016/03/118:10FOC-8E08Start of navigation message transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2016/03/098:50FOC-9E09Start of navigation message transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2016/03/09NoonFOC-5E24Start of transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring, NAGU 2016003
2016/03/01NoonFOC-8E08Few hours transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2016/02/28NoonFOC-9E09Few hours transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2016/02/25NoonFOC-9E09Restart of signal transmission, short outage in the afternoonCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2016/02/24NoonFOC-8E08Restart of signal transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2016/02/21NoonFOC-8E08End of signal transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2016/02/21MorningFOC-9E09End of signal transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2016/02/18MorningFOC-9E09Start of signal transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2016/02/17AfternoonFOC-8E08Restart of signal transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2016/02/16MorningFOC-8E08Signal transmission until noonCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2016/02/09EveningFOC-1E18Restart of signal transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/12/22MorningIOV-1E11End of transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring,
NAGU 2015022
2015/12/21EveningIOV-1E11Start of transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring,
NAGU 2015018
2015/12/18EveningFOC-4E22End of transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring,
NAGU 2015020
2015/12/17NoonIOV-2E12Short transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring,
NAGU 2015019
2015/12/13EveningFOC-4E22Start of transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring,
NAGU 2015016
2015/11/21FOC-6E30Start of navigation message transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/11/21AfternoonFOC-6E30Short transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/11/20FOC-5E24Start of navigation message transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/11/20EveningFOC-5E24Short transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/11/16NoonFOC-1E18Start of transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/11/15MorningFOC-5E24End of transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/11/14MorningFOC-6E30End of transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/11/14EveningFOC-5E24Start of transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/11/13EveningFOC-6E30Start of transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/11/09MorningFOC-5E24Start of signal transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/11/09EveningFOC-6E30Start of signal transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/11/03FOC-4E22Start of navigation message transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/10/12NoonFOC-5E24End of signal transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/10/12MorningFOC-6E30Signal transmission from morning until afternoonCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/10/11MorningFOC-6E30End of signal transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/10/10MorningFOC-5E24Start of signal transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/10/10EveningFOC-6E30Start of signal transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/10/07NoonFOC-3E19Short transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring,
NAGU 2015012 and 2015013
2015/10/06MorningFOC-1E18Restart of signal transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/10/0512:20FOC-3E26Start of navigation message transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/10/02EveningFOC-3E26Restart of signal transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/09/20EveningFOC-1E18Start of transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/09/10EveningFOC-4E22Restart of signal transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/09/08EveningFOC-2E14Restart of signal transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/07/23EveningFOC-3E26Start of transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/07/12NoonFOC-2E14Start of transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/06/20FOC-3E26Start of navigation message transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/06/17AfternoonFOC-4E22Start of transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/06/16AfternoonFOC-3E26Several hours transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/06/08AfternoonFOC-4E22Several hours transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/06/07NoonFOC-4E22Short transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/06/06FOC-3E26End of transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/06/04FOC-4E22End of transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/06/02EveningFOC-3E26Start of transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/05/31MorningFOC-4E22Start of transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/05/31EveningFOC-3E26Several hours transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/05/30NoonFOC-3E26Several hours transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/05/29MorningFOC-3E26End of transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/05/29EveningFOC-4E22Several hours transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/05/28NoonFOC-4E22Several hours transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/05/28EveningFOC-3E26Start of transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/05/26NoonFOC-3E26Short transmission outage, clock adjustmentCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/05/25EveningFOC-3E26Restart of signal transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/05/2415:13FOC-3E26Start of signal transmission for a few hoursCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/05/22EveningFOC-4E22Restart of signal transmission followed by short outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/05/2111:32FOC-4E22Start of signal transmission for a few hoursCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/03/1719:19FOC-2E14Start of signal transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/03/10+11IOV-*E1*Navigation data gapsCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/03/0614:40IOV-1E11Restart of navigation message transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/03/0614:30IOV-2E12Restart of navigation message transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/03/0614:40IOV-3E19Restart of navigation message transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/02/12AfternoonIOV-3E19Short transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/02/11MorningIOV-2E12Half-day transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/02/10MorningIOV-1E11Short transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/02/01MorningIOV-3E19Short transmission outage, switch to Rb clockCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/01/26IOV-*E1*Start of navigation message outageInside GNSS
2015/01/15AfternoonIOV-1E11Restart of tranmsissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/01/15Around noonIOV-2E12Restart of tranmsission, Rb clockCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/01/14MorningIOV-1E11Start of transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/01/13IOV-2E12Signal transmission from shortly after midnight until late eveningCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/01/09Around noonFOC-1E18Restart of transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2015/01/08AfternoonIOV-2E12Start of transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2014/10/10IOV-1/2/3E11, E12, E19Start of navigation data outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring,
NAGU 2014035/ 36/ 37
2014/10/1017:10:00IOV-1/2/3E11, E12, E19End of navigation data outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2014/09/24IOV-4E20Restart of E1 transmission, no E5 signal and no navigation dataCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2014/08/0818:37:00IOV-4E20End of E1 transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2014/08/0623:13:00IOV-4E20Restart of E1 transmission, no E5 signal and no navigation data
2014/06/28AfternoonIOV-2E12End of transmission outage, outage end according to NAGU 2014020 on 2014/07/02
2014/06/28AfternoonIOV-2E12Restart of transmissionCONGO/MGEX monitoring
2014/06/15Around noonIOV-2E12Start of transmission outage, outage start according to NAGU 2014017 on 2014/06/12
2014/06/15Around noonIOV-2E12Start of transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring,
NAGU 2014017
2014/06/01EveningIOV-1E11Restart of transmission, no navigation data until 2014/06/10 around noon
2014/05/27Around noonIOV-4E20Start of transmission outageMGEX monitoring,
NAGU 2014014
2014/05/20Late eveningIOV-1E11Start of transmission outageCONGO/MGEX monitoring,
NAGU 2014007
2014/02/237:47IOV-3E19Start of signal outageNAGU 2014004
2014/02/18IOV-1E11End of signal outageMGEX monitoring
2014/02/094:37IOV-1E11Start of signal outage (9 days)NAGU 2014003
2014/01/2208:49-17:42IOV-3E20Temporary unavailabilityNAGU 2014001/ 002
2014/01/1707:00-08:29IOV-3E20Temporary unavailabilityNAGU 2014001/ 002
2014/01/1507:14-15:02IOV-3E20Temporary unavailabilityNAGU 2014001/ 002
2013/10/1713:04IOV-4E20End of one month unavailability, payload on RAFSNAGU 2013021
2013/10/158:12IOV-1E11End of one month unavailability, payload on PHMNAGU 2013017
2013/10/148:30IOV-2E12End of one month unavailability, payload on PHMNAGU 2013019
2013/10/1415:20IOV-4E20End of one month unavailability, payload on PHMNAGU 2013020
2013/10/07IOV-1,-4E11,E20End of 3 weeks signal outageMGEX monitoring
2013/10/04IOV-2E12End of 1 week signal outageMGEX monitoring
2013/09/26IOV-2E12Start of 1 week signal outageMGEX monitoring
2013/09/14IOV-4E20Start of 3 weeks signal outageMGEX monitoring
2013/09/13IOV-1E11Start of 3 weeks signal outageMGEX monitoring
2013/09/1310:19IOV-4E20Start of one month unavailabilityNAGU 2013011,-014,-020,-021
2013/09/1311:49IOV-3E19Start of one month unavailabilityNAGU 2013011,-014,-020
2013/09/126:53IOV-2E12Start of one month unavailabilityNAGU 2013011,-013,-018
2013/09/1213:05IOV-1E11Start of one month unavailabilityNAGU 2013011,-012,-017
2013/08/2314:08IOV-1E11End of 4-day test campaign with dummy navigation messages; payload on RAFS clockNAGU 2013007
2013/08/2314:11IOV-4E20End of 4-day test campaign with dummy navigation messages; payload on RAFS clockNAGU 2013010
2013/08/2314:24IOV-2E12End of 4-day test campaign with dummy navigation messages; payload on RAFS clockNAGU 2013008
2013/08/2315:20IOV-3E19End of 4-day test campaign with dummy navigation messages; payload on RAFS clockNAGU 2013009
2013/08/21IOV-4E20Switch to RAFSTUM MGEX monitoring
2013/08/20IOV-2,-3E12,E19Switch to RAFSTUM MGEX monitoring
2013/08/196:00IOV-1,2,3,4E11,E12,
E19,E20
Start of 4-day test campaign with dummy navigation messagesNAGU 2013003-006
2013/08/19IOV-1E11Switch to RAFSTUM MGEX monitoring
2013/07/0110:25IOV-4E20End of two-week unavailabilityNAGU 2013002
2013/06/1416:48IOV-4E20Start of two weeks unavailabilityNAGU 2013001
2013/04/09Around noonIOV-4E20Short transmission outageTUM CONGO/MGEX monitoring
2013/03/14EveningIOV-4E20End of transmission outageTUM CONGO/MGEX monitoring
2013/03/13MorningIOV-4E20Start of transmission outage (1 day)TUM CONGO/MGEX monitoring
2013/03/06Around noonIOV-4E20End of transmission outageTUM CONGO/MGEX monitoring
2013/03/05Around noonIOV-4E20Short transmissionTUM CONGO/MGEX monitoring
2013/02/28EveningIOV-3E19Resumed transmission (short interruption after restart)TUM CONGO/MGEX monitoring
2013/02/21Around noonIOV-4E20Short transmission outageTUM CONGO/MGEX monitoring
2013/02/21AfternoonIOV-4E20Start of transmission outage (13 days)TUM CONGO/MGEX monitoring
2013/02/20Around noonIOV-4E20Short transmission outageTUM CONGO/MGEX monitoring
2013/02/19Before midnightIOV-4E20End of transmission outageTUM CONGO/MGEX monitoring
2013/02/15EveningIOV-4E20Start of transmission outage (4 days)TUM CONGO/MGEX monitoring
2013/02/07afternoonIOV-3E19Short transmission outageTUM CONGO/MGEX monitoring
2013/02/07EveningIOV-3E19Start of transmission outage (21 days)TUM CONGO/MGEX monitoring
2013/02/06morningIOV-3E19Short transmission outageTUM CONGO/MGEX monitoring
2013/02/04IOV-3E19Very short transmission outageTUM CONGO/MGEX monitoring
2013/01/27IOV-4E20Transmission outage (early morning until noon)TUM CONGO/MGEX monitoring
2013/01/25eveningIOV-4E20Transmission resumedTUM CONGO/MGEX monitoring
2013/01/23noonIOV-1E11Transmission resumedTUM CONGO/MGEX monitoring
2013/01/22early morningIOV-2E12Transmission resumedTUM CONGO/MGEX monitoring
2013/01/21IOV-4E20Transmission outage (4d)TUM CONGO/MGEX monitoring
2013/01/18eveningIOV-1E11Transmission outage (5d)TUM CONGO/MGEX monitoring
2013/01/18eveningIOV-2E12Transmission outage (4d)TUM CONGO/MGEX monitoring
2013/01/17~19:30IOV-1/2E11, E12Start transmission of navigation messageTUM CONGO/MGEX monitoring
2013/01/14noonIOV-3E19Short signal outageTUM CONGO/MGEX monitoring
2013/01/11eveningIOV-3E19E5 transmission resumedTUM CONGO/MGEX monitoring
2013/01/11afternoonIOV-2E12Clock switch to RubidiumTUM CONGO/MGEX monitoring
2013/01/10IOV-3E19E1 transmission resumed; switch to alternate PHM (?), clock not synchronized after outageTUM CONGO/MGEX monitoring
2013/01/08noonIOV-3E19Transmission stoppedTUM CONGO/MGEX monitoring
2013/01/07noonIOV-4E20Short outage; switch to alternate PHM (?), clock not synchronized after outageTUM CONGO/MGEX monitoring
2012/12/1217:15IOV-4E20Start of E1 signal transmissionTUM CONGO/MGEX monitoring
2012/12/0113:55IOV-3E19Start of E1 signal transmissionTUM CONGO/MGEX monitoring
2012/11/01IOV-1E11Clock switch (PHM to Rb); clock offset 28 us, drift 33.2 us/d (previously 1234 us and +7.14 us/d)TUM/CONGO
2012/07/26IOV-1E11Clock adjustment; clock offset ~0.0 ms, drift +7.19 us/d (PHM)TUM/CONGO
2012/07/23IOV-2E12Clock switch (Rb to PHM); clock offset ~0.0 ms, drift +7.36 us/d (PHM) TUM/CONGOTUM/CONGO
2012/07/16IOV-1E11Clock switch (Rb to PHM); clock offset -28.8 ms, drift +7.15 us/d (PHM)TUM/CONGO
2012/06/29IOV-2E12Start of CBOC transmissionESA; M. Falcone 12/12/05
2012/06/27IOV-2E12Clock adjustment; clock offset -0.8 ms, drift +41.9 us/d (Rb)TUM/CONGO
2012/06/27IOV-1E11Start of CBOC transmissionESA; M. Falcone 12/12/05
2012/06/06IOV-1E11clock adjustment; clock offset ~0.0 ms, drift +32.8 us/d (Rb)TUM/CONGO
2012/05/31IOV-2E12Clock adjustment; clock offset +50.0 ms, drift +43.1 us/d (Rb)TUM/CONGO
2012/03/01IOV-2E12End of transmission outage; clock offset -35.4 ms, drift +41.9 us/d (Rb)TUM/CONGO
2012/02/21IOV-1E11Clock adjustment; clock offset ~0.0 ms, drift +33.3 us/d (Rb)TUM/CONGO
2012/02/18IOV-2E12Clock jump; switch (PHM to Rb)?
2012/02/18IOV-2E12Start of transmission outage (10d)
2012/02/16IOV-1E11Clock switch (PHM to Rb); clock offset -36.0 ms, drift +33.3 us/d (Rb)TUM/CONGO
2012/02/13IOV-2E12Clock adjustment; clock offset ~0.0 ms, drift +7.41 us/d (PHM)TUM/CONGO
2012/02/10IOV-2E12End of transmission outage; possible clock switch PHM to PHM; clock offset +48.6 ms, drift +7.41 us/d (PHM)TUM/CONGO
2012/02/06IOV-2E12Start of transmission outage (4d)CONGO monitoring
2012/02/05IOV-1E11Clock adjustment; clock offset ~0.0 ms, drift +7.19 us/d (PHM)TUM/CONGO
2012/02/02IOV-1E11End of transmission outage; Clock offset -1.9 ms, drift +7.19 us/d (PHM)TUM/CONGO
2012/01/31IOV-2E12Clock switch (Rb to PHM); clock offset -72.1ms, drift +7.23 us/d (PHM)TUM/CONGO; exact date unclear due to multiple events and/or bad data
2012/01/18IOV-2E12Start of E5 transmissionCONGO
2012/01/18IOV-1E11Start of transmission outage (14d)CONGO monitoring
2012/01/18IOV-2E12Initial orbit/clock products from TUM; clock offset +89.2 ms, drift +38.2 us/d (Rb)TUM/CONGO
2012/01/11IOV-1E11Clock switch (Rb to PHM); clock offset +34.5 ms, drift +7.12 us/d (PHM)TUM/CONGO
2012/01/09IOV-2E12Start of E1 transmissionCONGO monitoring
2011/12/28IOV-1E11Initial orbit/clock products from TUM; clock offset +0.5 ms, drift +50.3 us/d (Rb)TUM/CONGO
2011/12/149:45IOV-1E11Start of E5 transmissionCONGO monitoring
2011/12/106:02IOV-1E11Start of E1 transmission, initial clock offset 850 msCANSPACE, CONGO monitoring

Notes:

 

Last Updated: 2018/10/04 11:28:39

BeiDou

This page provides an overview of the Satellites in the BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS). Technical parameters of the indivdual satellites and related conventions applied within the MGEX project are summarized in the Spacecraft Characteristics section. Information about the operational status of BeiDou can be found on the website of the Test and Assessment Research Center (TARC) of the China Satellite Navigation Office (CSNO).

Satellites

The regional BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS-2, earlier referred to as COMPASS) originally comprised a total of 15 launched satellites out of which 13 were fully operational in 2015. BDS-2 replacement satellites have been launched in 2016, 2018, and 2019. In mid 2015, China started the build-up of the 3rd generation BeiDou system (BDS-3) which shall offer a fully global navigation service by 2020. In 2015/2016, five BDS-3S in-orbit validation satellites have been launched. Build-up of the operational BeiDou-3 constellation was delayed by launcher issues and finally started in November 2017. The nominal number of 24 BeiDou-3 MEO satellites was reached in December 2019.

BeiDou-2
SVN
Common Name
Int. Sat. ID
NORAD ID
Sat. Cat. Name
PRN
Notes
C001 BEIDOU M1 2007-011A 31115 BEIDOU 2 C30 launched 2007-04-13; decommissioned
C002 BDS-2 GEO-2 2009-018A 34779 COMPASS G2 C02 launched 2009/04/14; inactive; uncontrolled
C003 BDS-2 GEO-1 2010-001A 36287 BEIDOU 3 C01 140.0°E; launched 2010/01/16
C004 BDS-2 GEO-3 2010-024A 36590 BEIDOU 4 C03 110.5°E; launched 2010/06/02;
inactive since 2018/09/28
C005 BDS-2 IGSO-1 2010-036A 36828 BEIDOU 5 C06 ~117°E; launched 2010/07/31
C006 BDS-2 GEO-4 2010-057A 37210 BEIDOU 6 C04 160.0°E; launched 2010/10/31
C007 BDS-2 IGSO-2 2010-068A 37256 BEIDOU 7 C07 ~119°E; launched 2010/12/17
C008 BDS-2 IGSO-3 2011-013A 37384 BEIDOU 8 C08 ~117°E; launched 2011/04/09
C009 BDS-2 IGSO-4 2011-038A 37763 BEIDOU 9 C09 ~95°E; launched 2011/07/26
C010 BDS-2 IGSO-5 2011-073A 37948 BEIDOU 10 C10 ~96°E; launched 2011/12/01
C011 BDS-2 GEO-5 2012-008A 38091 BEIDOU 11 C05 58.75°E; launched 2012/02/24
C012 BDS-2 MEO-3 2012-018A 38250 BEIDOU 12 C11 between slots A-6 and A-7;
launched 2012/04/29
C013 BDS-2 MEO-4 2012-018B 38251 BEIDOU 13 C12 between slots A-7 and A-8;
launched 2012/04/29
C014 BDS-2 MEO-5 2012-050A 38774 BEIDOU 14 C13 Slot B-3; launched 2012/09/18;
end of signal transmission 2014/10/21
C015 BDS-2 MEO-6 2012-050B 38775 BEIDOU 15 C14 between slots B-3 and B-4;
launched 2012/09/18
C016 BDS-2 GEO-6 2012-059A 38953 BEIDOU 16 C02 80.3°E; launched 2012/10/25
C017 BDS-2 IGSO-6 2016-021A 41434 BEIDOU IGSO-6 C15
C13
~94°E; launched 2016/03/29;
PRN switch from C15 to C13 on 2016/10/11
C018 BDS-2 GEO-7 2016-037A 41586 BD-2-G7 C17
C03
144.5°E; launched 2016/06/12;
PRN switch from C17 to C03 on 2018/09/29
C019 BDS-2 IGSO-7 2018-057A 43539 BEIDOU IGSO-7 C16 ~112°E; launched 2018/07/09
C020 BDS-2 GEO-8 2019-027A 44231 BEIDOU 2 G8 C18 ~80°E; launched 2019/05/17

 

Notes:
  • In the absence of official space vehicle numbers (SVNs), preliminary numbers for the BDS-2 satellites have been assigend for use within the MGEX project based on the launch sequence of the respective spacecraft.
  • C004 was moved from 84.0° E to new position between Nov 7 and 22, 2012.
  • BeiDou-2 metadata were published on December 9, 2019.
  • BeiDou-2 MEO satellites have been placed between official slot positions as soon as BeiDou-3 satellites have occupied their initial slot positions.
BeiDou-3S
SVN
Common Name
Int. Sat. ID
NORAD ID
Sat. Cat. Name
Manuf.
PRN
Notes
C101 BDS-3S IGSO-1S 2015-019A 40549 BD-17 SECM C16
C31
~93°E; launched 2015/03/30;
PRN switch from C31 to C16 on 2018/04/24
PRN switch from C16 to C31 on 2018/07/10
C102 BDS-3S MEO-1S 2015-037B 40749 BD-19 CAST C33
C19
C57
formerly slot A-1, launched 2015/07/30;
PRN switch from C33 to C19 on 2018/06/14;
C19 transmission until 2018/11/11
C103 BDS-3S MEO-2S 2015-037A 40748 BD-18 CAST C34
C28
C58
Slot A-6, launched 2015/07/30;
PRN switch from C34 to C28 on 2018/06/11;
C28 transmission until 2018/12/20
C104 BDS-3S IGSO-2S 2015-053A 40938 BD-20 CAST C32
C18
C56
~96°E; launched 2015/09/29;
PRN switch from C32 to C18 on 2018/06/07
C18 transmission until 2019/04/24
C105 BDS-3S MEO-3S 2016-006A 41315 BD-21 SECM C35 Slot B-1; launched 2016/02/01

 

Notes:
  • The five BEIDOU ??-S satellites are experimental satellites of the BeiDou-3 constellation manufactured by the Shanghai Engineering Center for Microsatellites (SECM) of the China Academy of Science (CAS) and China Academy of Space Technology (CAST), see [5].
  • The association of PRN/SVN and NORAD/Int.Sat.ID numbers for BEIDOU M1-S and M2-S in the above table has been corrected on 02-Nov-2017 based on information from ILRS/SHAO.
  • The I2-S and M1-S satellites can transmit an S-band signal.
  • No receiver tracking of SVN C105/PRN C35 so far. According to [8], C105 suffers from a failure of the transmit antenna.
  • B1/B3 dual-frequency tracking of C101/C31 after PRN switch in July 2018.
  • High-gain antenna measurements on 27/28 July 2018:
    • C101: B1/B2/B3 signal transmission
    • C104: B1/B3 signal transmission
    • C103: B1/B2/B3 signal transmission
BeiDou-3
SVN
Common Name
Int. Sat. ID
NORAD ID
Sat. Cat. Name
Manuf.
PRN
Notes
C201 BDS-3 MEO-1 2017-069A 43001 BEIDOU-3 M1 CAST C19
C47
Slot B-7; launched 2017/11/05;
PRN C19 used until 2018/06/12 and since 2018/11/15
C202 BDS-3 MEO-2 2017-069B 43002 BEIDOU-3 M2 CAST C20 Slot B-8; launched 2017/11/05
C203 BDS-3 MEO-7 2018-003A 43107 BEIDOU 3M3 SECM C27 Slot A-4; launched 2018/01/11
C204 BDS-3 MEO-8 2018-003B 43108 BEIDOU 3M4 SECM C28
C48
Slot A-5; launched 2018/01/11;
PRN C28 used until 2018/06/11 and since 2018/12/20
C205 BDS-3 MEO-4 2018-018A 43207 BEIDOU 3M5 CAST C22 Slot B-6; launched 2018/02/12
C206 BDS-3 MEO-3 2018-018B 43208 BEIDOU 3M6 CAST C21 Slot B-5; launched 2018/02/12
C207 BDS-3 MEO-9 2018-029A 43245 BEIDOU 3M7 SECM C29 Slot A-2; launched 2018/03/29
C208 BDS-3 MEO-10 2018-029B 43246 BEIDOU 3M8 SECM C30 Slot A-3; launched 2018/03/29
C209 BDS-3 MEO-5 2018-062A 43581 BEIDOU 3M9 CAST C23 Slot C-7; launched 2018/07/29
C210 BDS-3 MEO-6 2018-062B 43582 BEIDOU 3M10 CAST C24 Slot C-1; launched 2018/07/29
C211 BDS-3 MEO-12 2018-067A 43602 BEIDOU 3M11 SECM C26 Slot C-2; launched 2018/08/24
C212 BDS-3 MEO-11 2018-067B 43603 BEIDOU 3M12 SECM C25 Slot C-8; launched 2018/08/24
C213 BDS-3 MEO-13 2018-072A 43622 BEIDOU 3M13 CAST C32 Slot B-1; launched 2018/09/19
C214 BDS-3 MEO-14 2018-072B 43623 BEIDOU 3M14 CAST C33 Slot B-3; launched 2018/09/19
C215 BDS-3 MEO-16 2018-078A 43647 BEIDOU 3M15 SECM C35 Slot A-1; launched 2018/10/15
C216 BDS-3 MEO-15 2018-078B 43648 BEIDOU 3M16 SECM C34 Slot A-7; launched 2018/10/15
C217 BDS-3 GEO-1 2018-085A 43683 BEIDOU 3G1 CAST C59 ~140°E; launched 2018/11/01
C218 BDS-3 MEO-17 2018-093A 43706 BEIDOU 3M17 CAST C36 Slot C-4; launched 2018/11/18
C219 BDS-3 MEO-18 2018-093B 43707 BEIDOU 3M18 CAST C37 Slot C-6; launched 2018/11/18
C220 BDS-3 IGSO-1 2019-023A 44204 BEIDOU 3 IGSO-1 CAST C38 ~110.5° E; launched 2019/04/20
C221 BDS-3 IGSO-2 2019-035A 44337 BEIDOU 3 IGSO-2 CAST C39 launched 2019/06/24
C222 BDS-3 MEO-24 2019-061A 44542 BEIDOU 3M23 CAST C46 Slot C-5; launched 2019/09/22
C223 BDS-3 MEO-23 2019-061B 44543 BEIDOU 3M24 CAST C45 Slot C-3; launched 2019/09/22
C224 BDS-3 IGSO-3 2019-073A 44709 BEIDOU 3 IGSO-3 CAST C40 launched 2019/11/04
C225 BDS-3 MEO-22 2019-078A 44793 BEIDOU 3M21 SECM C44 Slot A-8; launched 2019/11/23
C226 BDS-3 MEO-21 2019-078B 44794 BEIDOU 3M22 SECM C43 Slot A-6; launched 2019/11/23
C227 BDS-3 MEO-19 2019-090A 44864 BEIDOU 3M19 CAST C41 Slot B-2; launched 2019/12/16
C228 BDS-3 MEO-20 2019-090B 44865 BEIDOU 3M20 CAST C42 moving to slot B-4; launched 2019/12/16
C229 BDS-3 GEO-2 2020-017A 45344 BEIDOU 3 G2 CAST C60 ~80°E; launched 2020/03/09
C230 BDS-3 GEO-3 2020-040A 45807 CAST C61 ~110.5°E; launched 2020/06/23

 

Notes:
  • As no official space vehicle numbers (SVNs) are available, SVNs are assigned based on the satellite generation:
    • C0?? for BeiDou-2
    • C1?? for BeiDou-3S
    • C2?? for BeiDou-3

    with monotonically increasing number within each satellite generation.

  • The numbering of the spacecraft in the satellite catalog differs from the common names for some satellites.
  • Common names are composed of the satellite type (BDS-2/BDS-3S/BDS-3) and the SVN from the Constellation Status website of CSNO/TARC.
  • The SVN used here follows the satellite catalog number (NORAD ID). In case of dual launches, the smaller NORAD ID is assigned the smaller SVN and vice versa.
  • Ten out of the 24 BDS-3 MEO satellites are manufactured by the Shanghai Engineering Center for Microsatellites (SECM), the others by the China Academy of Space Technology (CAST).
  • The PRN/SVN assignment of C222 and C223 was changed on 28-Nov-2019 according to information provided by CSNO/TARC.
  • The PRN/SVN assignment of C225 and C226 was changed on 08-Jan-2020 according to information provided by CSNO/TARC.
  • Information on BDS-3 is preliminary and might be subject to change.
  • PRNs beyond C37 are currently only tracked by Trimble Alloy receivers with firmware 5.42 (or later) and Javad TRE_3 receivers with firmware 3.7.9.

 

Spacecraft Characteristics

BeiDou-2

A comprehensive collection of technical information with associated references for the BeiDou-2 satellites can be obtained at the CNSS page of ESA’s eoPortal . BeiDou-2 metadata were released in December 2019 and are available on the BeiDou website.

The BeiDou-2 spacecraft are equipped with broadband GNSS antennas for the B1, B2, and B3 frequency bands as well as a laser retroreflector array (LRA) for satellite laser ranging. Frequency-specific antenna phase center offsets as well as LRA offsets are provided on the CSNO/TARC website. A corresponding ANTEX file is also available.

BeiDou-2
Parameter
GEO
IGSO
MEO
Satellite Bus DFH-3B DFH-3B DFH-3 (?)
In-orbit mass 1382 – 1551 kg 1272 – 1284 kg 1176 – 1193 kg
Body size ~1.8 m x ~2.2 m x ~2.5 m ~1.8 m x ~2.2 m x ~2.5 m ~1.8 m x ~2.2 m x ~2.5 m
Solar array size 2 x 3 x 2.2 m x 1.7 m 2 x 3 x 2.2 m x 1.7 m 2 x 3 x 2.2 m x 1.7 m
Span width ~17.7 m ~17.7 m ~17.7 m
Cross section ~27 m2 ~27 m2 ~27 m2
SRP acceleration 102 nm/s2 122 nm/s2 130 nm/s2

Figure 1 illustrates the IGS-specific spacecraft coordinate system. This system is aligned with the main body axes and originates in the plane opposite to the antenna. For all three spacecraft types

  • the +zIGS-axis is oriented along the boresight direction of the antenna,
  • the +yIGS-axis is parallel to the rotation axis of the solar panels, and
  • the +xIGS-axis completes a right handed system.

The detailed orientation of the +xIGS and +yIGS-axes for the BeiDOu-2 satellites is defined as shown in the drawings. The GNSS antenna is shifted in +xIGS-direction relative to the center of the front panel, while the LRA is located in the -xIGS/-yIGS-corner. On GEO satellites, the +xIGS-panel holds the C-band telecommunication antenna.

MEOIGSO GEO

Fig. 1 Spacecraft reference system and sensor location for the IGSO/MEO (left) and GEO satellites (right) of the BeiDou-2 regional navigation system. Reproduced from DOI 10.1016/j.asr.2015.06.019 with permission of Elsevier; satellite images courtesy CSNO.

The attitude of the BeiDou-2 satellites is actively controlled to orient the +zIGS axis towards the Earth. For the MEO and IGSO satellites a yaw steering attitude is employed, in which the satellite is continuously rotated about the +zIGS axis to maintain the yIGS-axis perpendicular to the plane made up by the Sun, Earth, and satellite. Similar to the IGS satellites, the +xIGS-axis is pointed towards the sun-lit hemisphere. For the GEO satellites an orbit normal mode is adopted, in which the +yIGS is oriented perpendicular to the orbital plan. The orbit normal mode is also employed by the MEO/IGSO satellite when the Sun elevation above the orbital plane is less than about 4°. An overview of BeiDou-2 attitude modes and related mathematical formulations are provided in [3]. Mode transitions at low β-angles are further discussed in [4].

The BDS-2 IGSO satellite C017 does not enter orbit normal mode. F. Dilssner (ESOC) developed an attitude model for this satellite [6] and reports that the MEO satellite C015 and the IGSO satellite C005 follow also this attitude law since October 2016 and March 2017, respectively. Reverse PPP analysis revealed that also C019 does not enter orbit normal mode [9] and that the attitude model of [6] is also valid for this satellite.

BeiDou-3S

BeiDou-3S stands for five BeiDou-3 test satellites launched in 2015/2016. They transmit legacy B1 signals similar to the BeiDou-2 satellites as well as modernized signals in the L1, E5, and B3 band.

Manufacturer satellite antenna phase center offsets as well as SLR retroreflector offsets for C101 – C104 are published in [5]. The M1S/M2S satellites are equipped with an additional fold-out phased array antenna. However, it is unknown which navigation signals are transmitted by this antenna.

BDS-3S

Fig. 2 Artist view of the SECM BeiDou-3S MEO satellite. Image courtesy of SECM.

BeiDou-3S
Parameter
M1S/M2S
M3S
I1S
I2S
Manufacturer CAST SECM SECM CAST
Mass ~1000 kg 848 kg 2800 kg
Body size 2.0 m x 2.5 m x 3.6 m
SRP acceleration 138 nm/s2 86 nm/s2 99 nm/s2
Notes Antenna failure [8] First Chinese H-maser in space
BeiDou-3

Information on the dimensions and the attitude law of the BDS-3 MEO satellites manufactured by SECM as well as PCO and LRA offset values are published in [7]. Metadata including current PRN/SVN assignment, satellite mass, LRA offsets, areas, and absorption coefficient are available at the BeiDou website (RAR compressed ASCII file). Frequency-specific antenna phase center offsets for BDS-2 and BDS-3 are proviced in a dedicated ANTEX file. Further information, attitude law, and format descritions are given in [11].

BeiDou-3
Parameter
MEO CAST
MEO SECM-A
MEO SECM-B
IGSO
GEO
Bus DFH-3B
In-orbit mass 941 – 1061 kg 1010 – 1045 kg 1075 – 1079 kg 2950 kg 3000 kg
Body size 1.68 m x 1.30 m x 2.16 m 2.55 m x 1.02 m x 1.23 m 2.80 m x 0.92 m x 1.35 m
Solar array size 2 x 10.22 m² 2 x 5.4 m² 2 x 5.4 m² 2 x 17.7 m² 2 x 17.7 m²
Primary clocks 2 RAFSs from CASC 2 PHMs from SHAO
Backup clocks 2 RAFSs from CASIC 2 RAFSs from CASIC
Notes C201/2, C205/6, C209/10, C213/4, C218/9, C222/3 C203/4, C207/8, C211/2, C215/6 C225/6 C220, C221, C224 C217, C229
Abbreviations
CASC China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation
CASIC China Aerospace Science and Industry Corporation
CAST China Academy of Space Technology
SHAO Shanghai Astronomical Observatory
SECM Shanghai Engineering Center for Microsatellites
References

[1] ILRS BeiDou (COMPASS) Center of Mass Information
[2] Dilssner F., Springer T., Schönemann E., Enderle W. (2014) Estimation of satellite antenna phase center corrections for BeiDou, IGS Workshop, Pasadena, California, USA
[3] Montenbruck O., Schmid R., Mercier F., Steigenberger P., Noll C., Fatkulin R., Kogure S., Ganeshan A.S. (2015) GNSS satellite geometry and attitude models, Advances in Space Research 56(6):1015-1029, DOI 10.1016/j.asr.2015.06.019
[4] Dai X., Ge M., Lou Y., Shi C., Wickert J., Schuh H. (2015) Estimating the yaw-attitude of BDS IGSO and MEO satellites, Journal of Geodesy 89(10):1005-1018, DOI 10.1007/s00190-015-0829-x
[5] Zhao Q., Wang C., Guo J., Wang B., Liu J. (2018) Precise orbit and clock determination for BeiDou-3 experimental satellites with yaw attitude analysis, GPS Solutions 22:4, DOI 10.1007/s10291-017-0673-y
[6] Dilssner F. (2017) A note on the yaw attitude modeling of BeiDou IGSO-6
[7] Shanghai Engineering Center for Microsatellites (2018) Satellite Geometry and Attitude Mode of MEO Satellites Developed by SECM, ION GNSS+ 2018
[8] Zhou R., Hu Z., Zhao Q., Li P., Wang W., He C., Cai C., Pan Z. (2018) Elevation-dependent pseudorange variation characteristics analysis for the new-generation BeiDou satellite navigation system, GPS Solututions 22:60, DOI 10.1007/s10291-018-0726-x
[9] Dilssner F. (2018), BeiDou IGSO-7, personal communication, 11 November 2018
[10] CSNO (2019) Definitions and descriptions of BDS/GNSS satellite parameters for high precision applications, BD 420025-2019, in Chinese

 

Last Updated: 2020/07/14 10:11:04

QZSS

This page provides an overview of the Satellites in the Quasi-Zenith Satellite System Constellation. Technical parameters of the individual satellites and related conventions applied within the MGEX project are summarized in the Spacecraft Characteristics section. Furthermore, a list of Events of interest for the QZSS data processing is given.

 

Satellites

The Quasi-Zenith Satellite System (QZSS) currently comprises three satellites in an inclined geo-synchronous orbit and one satellite in geo-stationary orbit.

Common Name
SVN
Int. Sat. ID
NORAD ID
PRN
Notes
QZS-1 (Michibiki) J001 2010-045A 37158 J01 launched 2010/09/11
QZS-2 (Michibiki-2) J002 2017-028A 42738 J02 launched 2017/06/01
QZS-3 (Michibiki-3) J003 2017-048A 42917 J07 launched 2017/08/19
QZS-4 (Michibiki-4) J004 2017-062A 42965 J03 launched 2017/10/09

Spacecraft Characteristics

A comprehensive collection of technical information with associated references for the QZS-1 spacecraft can be obtained at ESA’s eoPortal . The Cabinet Office provides QZSS Satellite Information and Operational History Information on a dedicated web site. Physical key parameters of the spacecraft are summarized below:

Parameter
QZS-1
QZS-2
QZS-3
QZS-4
Orbit IGSO IGSO GEO IGSO
Launch mass 4100 kg 4000 kg 4700 kg 4000 kg
Dry mass 1800 kg 1550 kg 1685 kg 1550 kg
Body size 2.35 m x 2.35 m x 5.70 m 2.40 m x 2.40 m x 6.20 m 2.4 m x 2.4 m x 5.4 m 2.40 m x 2.40 m x 6.20 m
Span width 25.25 m 19.00 m 19 m 19.00 m
SRP acceleration 156 nm/s2 n/a n/a n/a

 

QZS-1

The QZS-1 spacecraft is equipped with a primary L-band antenna (L-ANT) for transmission of the L1 C/A, L1C, L2C, L5, and L6 LEX signals, whereas a separate (LS-ANT) antenna is used for the L1 SAIF signal. In addition, a laser retroreflector array (LRA) is provided to enable precise distance measurements using satellite laser ranging.

QZS-1 body frame
Fig. 1 QZSS spacecraft reference system and sensor locations. Reproduced from DOI 10.1016/j.asr.2015.06.019 with permission of Elsevier; satellite image courtesy JAXA.

Phase center coordinates of the GNSS antennas and the LRA as recommended for QZS-1 processing within the MGEX project are provided in the following table. All values refer to the spacecraft coordinate system illustrated in Fig. 1. The spacecraft coordinate system is aligned with the main body axes and originates near the center of the launch adapter plane. In accord with IGS conventions, the individual axes are aligned in the following way:

  • the +zIGS-axis is oriented along the boresight direction of the L-ANT antenna;
  • the +yIGS-axis is parallel to the rotation axis of the solar panels and oriented such that the LRA is located in the first quadrant of the xIGS/yIGS-plane relative to the L-ANT;
  • the +xIGS-axis completes a right handed system;

While the center of mass (CoM) may shift by roughly 3 cm over the mission life-time, the value for mid 2012 is adopted as a conventional value for a harmonized processing. Begin-of-life (BoL) and End-of-life (EoL) values are given for information, only. CoM coordinates previously reported in [2] for satellite laser ranging support are superseded by more recent values provided in [1].

A machine-readable version of the phase center offset information for QZS-1 is provided as part of the IGS14 ANTEX file.

QZS-1
Coordinates (w.r.t. origin)
Coordinates (w.r.t. CoM)
Reference
xIGS yIGS zIGS xIGS yIGS zIGS
L-ANT L1 0.0 mm 0.0 mm +5017.8 mm -0.9 mm +2.9 mm +3197.9 mm [1]
L-ANT L2 0.0 mm 0.0 mm +4812.8 mm -0.9 mm +2.9 mm +2992.9 mm [1]
L-ANT L5 0.0 mm 0.0 mm +4897.8 mm -0.9 mm +2.9 mm +3077.9 mm [1]
L-ANT L6 0.0 mm 0.0 mm +4967.8 mm -0.9 mm +2.9 mm +3147.9 mm [1]
LS-ANT L1 -1150.0 mm -700.0 mm +4835.0 mm -1150.9 mm -697.1 mm +3015.1 mm [1]
LRA +1150.0 mm +550.0 mm +4505.3 mm +1149.1 mm +552.9 mm +2685.4 mm [2]
CoM (BoL) +0.9 mm -2.9 mm +1819.2 mm [1]
CoM (Jul 2012) +0.9 mm -2.9 mm +1819.9 mm [1]
CoM (EoL) +0.9 mm -3.1 mm +1851.2 mm [1]

The attitude law that describes the orientation of the QZS-1 satellite in space, depends on the elevation of the Sun relative to the orbital plane (also known as β angle):

  • For |β| > 20° the satellite is operated in “yaw-steering mode”. Here, the +zIGS-axis is pointed to the Earth, while the yIGS-axis is oriented perpendicular to the plane made up by the Sun, Earth, and satellite. Furthermore, xIGS-axis is oriented such that the Sun is always located in the +xIGS hemisphere, while the -xIGS-axis points to “deep space” at all times to minimize heating of the onboard clocks. The QZS-1 yaw-steering mode matches the standard attitude law of the GPS, GLONASS, and Galileo satellites.
  • For |β| < 20° the satellite is operated in “orbit normal mode”. While the +zIGS-axis is again pointed towards the center of the Earth, the +yIGS-axis is held perpendicular to the orbital plane and parallel to the orbital angular momentum vector. The +xIGS-axis is roughly oriented in anti-flight direction.

While the location of the L-ANT phase center relative to the center of mass is essentially independent of the yaw-angle (i.e. the rotation about the +zIGS-axis), knowledge of the actual attitude is required for phase wind-up modeling and for the computation of the absolute LS-ANT and LRA positions.

Further details and the mathematical formulations of the QZS-1 attitude modes are provided in [3] and [4].

 

QZS-2, QZS-3, QZS-4

Satellite property information and operational history information of the Block II IGSO satellites QZS-2 and QZS-4 as well as the GEO satellite QZS-3 are provided by the Cabinet Office in different documents available at a specific website. These documents include information about reference frames, attitude law, mass and center of mass, antenna phase center corrections, geometry, group delays, and transmit power.

 

Notes:
  • QZS-1 operational history information as well as complementary information on the current status of QZSS is provided at the QZSS web site of the Cabinet Office. This site also provides the QZSS Interface Specification and Notice Advisory to QZSS Users (NAQU) messages.
  • Supplementary information related to Michibiki-1 can also be found at the QZSS project web site of JAXA.
  • QZSS employs distinct PRNs for the L1 SAIF SBAS signal (PRN(SAIF) = 183, 184, …) and the other ranging signals (PRN(std) = 193, 194,…). In order to ensure a unique RINEX satellite number for each QZSS satellite, it is recommended to consistently use the satellite number “Jnn” with nn = PRN(std)-192=PRN(SAIF)-182. Use of an SBAS RINEX satellite number “Snn” with nn = PRN(SAIF)-100 is deprecated.
  • The experimental remote synchronization system for an onboard crystal oscillator (RESSOX) of QZSS aims at the use of a ground-controlled low cost oscillator onboard a GNSS satellite as an alternative to a high-performance atomic frequency standard.
  • List of events until 2017

 

References

[1] Kogure S., priv. comm. (20 July 2012)
[2] QZS-1 ILRS SLR Mission Support Request Form – Retroreflector Information
[3] Ishijima Y., Inaba N., Matsumoto A., Terada K., Yonechi H., Ebisutani H., Ukawa S., Okamoto T., “Design and Development of the First Quasi-Zenith Satellite Attitude and Orbit Control System”, Proceedings of the IEEE Aerospace Conference, March 7-14 2009, Big Sky, MT, USA, (2009). DOI 10.1109/AERO.2009.4839537
[4] Montenbruck O., Schmid R., Mercier F., Steigenberger P., Noll C., Fatkulin R., Kogure S., Ganeshan A. S. (2015) GNSS satellite geometry and attitude models. Advances in Space Research 56(6):1015-1029. DOI 10.1016/j.asr.2015.06.019
[5] Cabinet Office (2020) QZSS Satellite Information

Last Updated: 2020/06/09 12:50:50

SBAS

This page provides an overview of the satellites used in worldwide Satellite Based Augmentation Systems.

  • BeiDou Satellite-Based Augmentation System (BDSBAS)
  • European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service (EGNOS)
  • GPS Aided Geo Augmented Navigation (GAGAN)
  • Geoscience Australia (SBAS) Test-Bed Project (GATBP)
  • Multi-functional Satellite Augmentation System (MSAS)
  • Nigerian Satellite Augmentation System (NSAS)
  • Quasi-Zenith Satellite System (QZSS)
  • System for Differential Corrections and Monitoring (SDCM)
  • Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS)
Satellites
System Common Name Long. Int. Sat. ID NORAD ID PRN Signals Notes
BDSBAS BeiDou-3 GEO-1 140°E 2018-085A 43683 130 B1C/B2a Launched 2018/11/01; BDSBAS signal transmission since November 9, 2018
BeiDou-3 GEO-2 80°E 2020-017A 45344 144 B1C/B2a Launched 2020/03/09
BeiDou-3 GEO-3 110.5°E 2020-040A 45807 143 B1C/B2a Launched 2020/06/23
EGNOS Inmarsat 3-F2 (AOR-E) 15.5°W 1996-053A 24307 120 L1 Inmarsat 3-F2 began Safety-of-Life Service on March 2, 2011; End of signal transmission in 2018.
Inmarsat 4-F2 64°E 2005-044A 28899 126 L1 Launched 2005/11/08
SES-5 (Sirius-5, Astra-4B) 5°E 2012-036A 38652 136 L1/L5 Launched 2012/07/10; operational since Sep. 02, 2015.
Astra-5B 31.5°E 2014-011B 39617 123 L1/L5 Launched 2014/03/22; transmission of L1 test signals started Dec. 11, 2014.
EUTELSAT 5 West B 5°W 2019-067A 44624 121? Launched 2019/10/09
GAGAN GSAT-8 55°E 2011-022A 37605 127 L1/L5 Launched May 20, 2011. Certifed horizontal/vertical service since Feb. 2014/April 2015.
GSAT-10 83°E 2012-051B 38779 128 L1/L5 Launched 2012/09/28; certifed horizontal/vertical service since Feb. 2014/April 2015.
GATBP Inmarsat 4-F1 (PAC-W) 143.5°E 2005-009A 28628 122 L1/L5 Transmitting message type 0; not for safety-of-life use. L1 transmissions began May 31, 2017.
MSAS MTSAT-1R 140°E 2005-006A 28622 129 L1 MSAS commissioned for aviation use on September 27, 2007. Either satellite can transmit both PRN signals if necessary.
MTSAT-2 145°E 2006-004A 28937 137 L1 MSAS commissioned for aviation use on September 27, 2007. Either satellite can transmit both PRN signals if necessary.
NSAS NigComSat-1R 42°E 2011-077A 38014 147 L1/L5 L1 tests
QZSS QZS-1 137.5°E 2010-045A 37158 183 L1 See QZSS Status Page
QZS-2 136°E 2017-028A 42738 184/196 L1/L5 See QZSS Status Page
QZS-3 127°E 2017-048A 42917 189/197 L1/L5 See QZSS Status Page
QZS-4 136°E 2017-062A 42965 185/200 L1/L5 See QZSS Status Page
SDCM Luch-5A 167°E 2011-074B 37951 140 L1 Launched on December 11, 2011. Initially positioned at 58.5°E, it was shifted to 95°E between about May 30 and June 28, 2012, then shifted 167°E between about Nov. 30 and Dec. 22, 2012. Transmissions as PRN 140 began on July 12, 2012. Transmitted occasional, non-coherent code/carrier test signals.
Luch-5B 16°W 2014-023A 39727 141 L1 Launched April 28, 2014. Testing may have started using PRN 140, not 141.
Luch-5V 16°W 2012-061A 38977 125 L1 Launched Nov. 2, 2012, and started transmitting signals on Jan. 17, 2013.
WAAS TeleSat Anik F1R (CRE) 107.3°W 2005-036A 28868 138 L1/L5 Anik F1R ranging supports enroute through precision approach modes. The payload, operated by Lockheed Martin for the FAA, is known as LMPRS-2.
Intelsat Galaxy 15 (CRW) 133°W 2005-041A 28884 135 L1/L5 Galaxy 15 ranging supports enroute through precision approach modes. Switched to backup satellite oscillator on Jan. 6, 2012. The payload, operated by Lockheed Martin for the FAA, is known as LMPRS-1.
EUTELSAT 117W B 117°W 2016-038B 41589 131 L1/L5 Not yet approved for operational use
Notes:
  • The information given above is largely based on the The Almanac maintained by R. Langley for the GPS World magazine.
  • Dual-frequency (L1/L5) observations of WAAS and GAGAN satellites are provided by a limited set of monitoring stations of the MGEX network. The respective stations and tracked satellites are listed in the RINEX Observation File Summary generated on a daily basis by the Astronomical Institute of the University of Bern.
  • In RINEX observations and navigation files, SBAS satellites are identified by a three character satellite number made up of the constellation letter “S” and the two digit number nn=PRN-100. For QZSS (see QZSS Interface Specification, different PRN numbers are employed for the L1 SAIF SBAS signal (PRN(L1 SAIF)=183, 184), the L5 SAIF SBAS signal (PRN(L5 SAIF)=196), and the other ranging signals (PRN(std)=193, 194). In order to ensure a unique RINEX satellite number for each QZSS satellite, it is recommended to use the satellite number “Jnn” with n=PRN(L1 SAIF)-182 (=PRN(std)-192) when referring to QZSS L1 SAIF observations or navigation messages. The use of an SBAS RINEX satellite number “Snn” with nn=PRN(SAIF)-100 is deprecated for QZSS satellites.
  • For the assignment of GPS and SBAS PRN numbers see the information page of the Los Angeles Air Force Base.
  • On March 22 and 23, 2012, Inmarsat-4-F2 at 25 degrees east using PRN126 and Artemis at 21.5 degrees east using PRN124 switched roles. PRN126 became an EGNOS operational signal-in-space satellite while PRN124 became the test satellite, transmitting message type 0. PRN120 and PRN126 returned to service around 17:00 UTC on Tuesday, June 26. According to an EGNOS service announcement dated April 3, 2012 the switch was due to the aging state of the Artemis satellite. (Source: CANSPACE, GPS World)
  • L1Sb transmission of QZS-3 with PRN 187 is planned to start in 2020.
Historic SBAS satellites
System Common Name Long. Int. Sat. ID NORAD ID PRN Signals Notes
EGNOS Inmarsat 4-F2 (IOR-W) 25°E 2005-044A 28899 126 L1 Inmarsat-4-F2 began Safety-of-Life Service on March 22, 2012, and is transmitting message type 2. Retired.
WAAS Inmarsat 4-F3 (AMR) 98°W 2008-039A 33278 133 L1/L5 Inmarsat-4-F3 supports non-precision approach ranging service. End of signal transmission 15 Nov 2017

Events

Date
UTC
Satellite
PRN
Description
Notes
2017/06/01 Morning Inmarsat 4-F1 S22 Short L5 signal transmission, only tracked by two SEPT_POLARX4 receivers (GAMG and UNX3) CONGO/MGEX monitoring
2017/05/31 Morning Inmarsat 4-F1 S22 Start of intermittent L1 signal transmission CONGO/MGEX monitoring
Last Updated: 2020/07/14 10:11:04

GIOVE

This page provides an overview of the Galileo In-Orbit Validation Element (GIOVE) satellites, namely GIOVE-A and GIOVE-B.

Satellites
Common Name SVN Int. Sat. ID NORAD ID PRN Notes
GIOVE-A E001 2005-051A 28922 E01/E51 Decommissioned 2012/06/30
GIOVE-B E002 2008-020A 32781 E16/E52 Decommissioned 2012/07/23

Note: Due to the late announcement of official space vehicle identifiers for the GIOVE-A/B satellites, different PRN assignments have been adopted by receiver manufacturers and data providers for these satellites. While PRN numbers E01/E16 have been used within the broadcast navigation messages of GIOVE-A/B other possible identifications include

  • PRN E01/E02 (Javad receivers)
  • PRN E32/E31 (Septentrio PolaRx/AsteRx receivers)
  • PRN E51/E52 (Septentrio GeNeRx1 receiver, NovAtel EuroPak15a, Trimble NetR9 receiver, RTCM3-MSM draft)
  • PRN E01/E16 (Leica GRX1200+GNSS/GR10/GR25 receivers)

So far, no unique PRN numbering scheme has been adopted within the IGS and RINEX files collected within the MGEX project may be based on either of the above conventions. Users of MGEX data prior to the deactivation of GIOVE-A/B in the summer of 2012 are advised to carefully check the employed data and adjust the PRN numbers to ensure consistency in their processing where needed. In particular, attention should be paid to the fact, that different PRN conventions might be used concurrently in data products resulting from the same receiver but using different RINEX generation tools.

Spacecraft Characteristics

A comprehensive collection of technical information with associated references for the GIOVE-A and GIOVE-B spacecraft can be obtained at ESA’s eoPortal as well as the ESA report on GIOVE Experimentation Results (ESA SP-1320).

Parameter GIOVE-A GIOVE-B
Launch mass 602 kg 530 kg
Dry mass 550 kg 502 kg
Body size 1.3 m x 1.8 m x 1.65 m (stowed envelope) 0.95 m x 0.95 m x 2.4 m
Solar array size 2 x 2 x 1.74 m x 0.98 m 2 x 4 x 1.5 m x 0.8 m
Span width ~10 m ~10 m
Cross section 9 m2 12 m2
SRP acceleration 99 nm/s2 151 nm/s2

 

The GIOVE-A/B spacecraft are equipped with broadband GNSS antennas for the E1, E5ab and E6 frequency bands and with a laser retroreflector array (LRA) for satellite laser ranging.

GIOVE-A GIOVE-B

 

Fig. 1 Spacecraft reference system and sensor location for the GIOVE-A (left), GIOVE-B (right) satellites. Blue arrows and labels indicate the reference system adopted by the IGS, while the manufacturer-specific systems are illustrated in red. During nominal yaw-steering, the Sun is always confined to the +xIGS-hemisphere. Reproduced from DOI 10.1016/j.asr.2015.06.019 with permission of Elsevier; satellite images courtesy ESA.

Phase center coordinates of the GNSS antenna and the LRA of GIOVE-A/B satellites as recommended for use within the MGEX project are provided in the following table. A machine-readable version of the phase center offset information for each satellite is provided as part of the IGS14 ANTEX product. All values refer to the IGS-specific spacecraft coordinate system illustrated in blue in Fig. 1. The spacecraft coordinate system is aligned with the main body axes and originates near the anti-Earth panel. By convention of the IGS

  • the +zIGS-axis is oriented along the boresight direction of the antenna,
  • the yIGS-axis is parallel to the rotation axis of the solar panels and the positive yIGS-direction is defined through the adopted +xIGS-direction,
  • the +xIGS-axis completes a right handed system and is chosen such that the Sun is always located in the +xIGS hemisphere during nominal yaw-steering.

The detailed orientation of the +xIGS and +yIGS-axes for individual satellites is defined as shown in the drawings.

GIOVE-A
Coordinates (w.r.t. origin) Coordinates (w.r.t. CoM) Reference
xIGS yIGS zIGS xIGS yIGS zIGS
GNSS Antenna E1 0.0 mm 0.0 mm +1658.0 mm -4.0 mm +1.0 mm +862.0 mm [1]
E5a/b/ab 0.0 mm 0.0 mm +1690.0 mm -4.0 mm +1.0 mm +894.0 mm [1]
E6 0.0 mm 0.0 mm +1665.0 mm -4.0 mm +1.0 mm +869.0 mm [1]
LRA +832.0 mm +654.0 mm +1476.0 mm +828.0 mm +655.0 mm +680.0 mm [1]
CoM (Mar 2006) +4.0 mm -1.0 mm +796.0 mm [1]

 

GIOVE-B
Coordinates (w.r.t. origin) Coordinates (w.r.t. CoM) Reference
xIGS yIGS zIGS xIGS yIGS zIGS
GNSS Antenna E1 0.0 mm 0.0 mm +2289.2 mm -3.2 mm +3.4 mm +1351.7 mm [1]
E5a/b/ab 0.0 mm 0.0 mm +2288.7 mm -3.2 mm +3.4 mm +1351.2 mm [1]
E6 0.0 mm 0.0 mm +2287.6 mm -3.2 mm +3.4 mm +1350.1 mm [1]
LRA +807.5 mm -297.5 mm +2267.6 mm +804.3 mm -294.1 mm +1330.1 mm [1]
CoM (BoL) +3.2 mm -3.4 mm +937.5 mm [1]

 

GNSS antenna offsets for GIOVE-A/B are based on calibrated phase centers for each frequency band and center-of-mass information for the begin of life (BoL) as provided by ESA.

For the modeling of satellite laser ranging measurements nominal coordinates of the effective LRA reflection point have been specified by ESA as part of the ILRS mission support request.

Similar to the GPS satellites the attitude of the GIOVE satellites is actively controlled to orient the +zIGS axis towards the Earth. At the same time the spacecraft is continuously rotated about this axis to maintain the yIGS-axis perpendicular to the plane made up by the Sun, Earth, and satellite. The +xIGS-panel is always sunlit, while the -xIGS-panel is oriented towards “deep space”. Details of the attitude control during noon- and midnight turns in periods when the Sun is close to the orbital plane are described in [2] and [3].

References

[1] Zandbergen R., Navarro D.; “Specification of Galileo and GIOVE Space Segment properties relevant for Satellite Laser Ranging”, ESA-EUING-TN/10206, Issue 3.2, 08/05/2008, Galileo Project Office, ESA, Noordwijk;
[2] Johnston A.G.Y., Holt A.P., Jackson C.D., “GIOVE-A AOCS : An Experience from Verification to Flight”, 7th Int. ESA Conference on Guidance, Navigation & Control Systems, 2-5 June 2008, Tralee, County Kerry, Ireland (2008).
[3] Zentgraf P., Fischer H.-D., Kaffer L., Konrad A., Lehrl E., Müller C., Oesterlin W., Wiegand M.; “AOC Design and Test for GSTB-V2B”, 6th Int. ESA Conference on Guidance, Navigation and Control Systems, 17-20 Oct. 2005 in Loutraki, Greece (2005).

Events
Date UTC Satellite PRN Description Notes
2011/11/25 GIOVE-B E16/E52 Clock switch (PHM to Rb) CONGO monitoring
2012/02/27 GIOVE-B E16/E52 End of transmission outage CONGO monitoring
2012/06/30 21:00 GIOVE-A E01/E51 End of mission ESA
2012/07/23 11:14 GIOVE-B E16/E52 End of mission ESA
Last Updated: 2017/11/08 14:49:10

MGEX Product Analysis

This website is updated on a weekly basis, last update: 2020-JUL-12 21:57:01

AC ID AC full name Latest file
COD Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE) COD0MGXFIN_20201860000_01D_05M_ORB.SP3
GFZ Deutsches GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam (GFZ) GFZ0MGXRAP_20201860000_01D_05M_ORB.SP3
GRG CNES/CLS GRG0MGXFIN_20201860000_01D_15M_ORB.SP3
JAX Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) JAX0MGXFIN_20201920000_01D_05M_ORB.SP3
SHA Shanghao Observatory (SHAO) SHA0MGXRAP_20201470000_01D_15M_ORB.SP3
TUM Technische Universität München (TUM) TUM0MGXRAP_20193140000_01D_05M_ORB.SP3
WUM Wuhan University WUM0MGXFIN_20201880000_01D_15M_ORB.SP3

Product availability

Orbit availability

Signal Transmissions

GPS signal transmission

GPS signal transmission

GLONASS signal transmission

GLONASS signal transmission

BDS signal transmission

BDS signal transmission

Galileo signal transmission

Galileo signal transmission

QZSS signal transmission

QZSS signal transmission

IRNSS signal transmission

IRNSS availability plot based on one station only until beginning of 2017. Gaps might be related to station outages!

IRNSS signal transmission

SBAS signal transmission

SBAS signal transmission

Clock Time Series

Satellites per constellation:

GAL: E01 E02 E03 E04 E05 E07 E08 E09 E11 E12 E13 E14 E15 E18 E19 E21 E24 E25 E26 E27 E30 E31 E33 E36 BDI: C06 C07 C08 C09 C10 C13 C16 BDM: C11 C12 C14

ACs per constellation:

BDI: COD0MGXFIN GFZ0MGXRAP SHA0MGXRAP WUM0MGXFIN BDM: COD0MGXFIN GFZ0MGXRAP SHA0MGXRAP WUM0MGXFIN GAL: COD0MGXFIN GFZ0MGXRAP GRG0MGXFIN SHA0MGXRAP

Analysis options:

Detrend order: 2

GAL satellite clock time series and Allan deviation

COD E01

COD E01 clock time seriesCOD E01 Allan deviation

GFZ E01

GFZ E01 clock time seriesGFZ E01 Allan deviation

GRG E01

GRG E01 clock time seriesGRG E01 Allan deviation

COD E02

COD E02 clock time seriesCOD E02 Allan deviation

GFZ E02

GFZ E02 clock time seriesGFZ E02 Allan deviation

GRG E02

GRG E02 clock time seriesGRG E02 Allan deviation

COD E03

COD E03 clock time seriesCOD E03 Allan deviation

GFZ E03

GFZ E03 clock time seriesGFZ E03 Allan deviation

GRG E03

GRG E03 clock time seriesGRG E03 Allan deviation

COD E04

COD E04 clock time seriesCOD E04 Allan deviation

GFZ E04

GFZ E04 clock time seriesGFZ E04 Allan deviation

GRG E04

GRG E04 clock time seriesGRG E04 Allan deviation

COD E05

COD E05 clock time seriesCOD E05 Allan deviation

GFZ E05

GFZ E05 clock time seriesGFZ E05 Allan deviation

GRG E05

GRG E05 clock time seriesGRG E05 Allan deviation

COD E07

COD E07 clock time seriesCOD E07 Allan deviation

GFZ E07

GFZ E07 clock time seriesGFZ E07 Allan deviation

GRG E07

GRG E07 clock time seriesGRG E07 Allan deviation

COD E08

COD E08 clock time seriesCOD E08 Allan deviation

GFZ E08

GFZ E08 clock time seriesGFZ E08 Allan deviation

GRG E08

GRG E08 clock time seriesGRG E08 Allan deviation

COD E09

COD E09 clock time seriesCOD E09 Allan deviation

GFZ E09

GFZ E09 clock time seriesGFZ E09 Allan deviation

GRG E09

GRG E09 clock time seriesGRG E09 Allan deviation

COD E11

COD E11 clock time seriesCOD E11 Allan deviation

GFZ E11

GFZ E11 clock time seriesGFZ E11 Allan deviation

GRG E11

GRG E11 clock time seriesGRG E11 Allan deviation

COD E12

COD E12 clock time seriesCOD E12 Allan deviation

GFZ E12

GFZ E12 clock time seriesGFZ E12 Allan deviation

GRG E12

GRG E12 clock time seriesGRG E12 Allan deviation

COD E13

COD E13 clock time seriesCOD E13 Allan deviation

GFZ E13

GFZ E13 clock time seriesGFZ E13 Allan deviation

GRG E13

GRG E13 clock time seriesGRG E13 Allan deviation

COD E14

COD E14 clock time seriesCOD E14 Allan deviation

GFZ E14

GFZ E14 clock time seriesGFZ E14 Allan deviation

GRG E14

GRG E14 clock time seriesGRG E14 Allan deviation

COD E15

COD E15 clock time seriesCOD E15 Allan deviation

GFZ E15

GFZ E15 clock time seriesGFZ E15 Allan deviation

GRG E15

GRG E15 clock time seriesGRG E15 Allan deviation

COD E18

COD E18 clock time seriesCOD E18 Allan deviation

GFZ E18

GFZ E18 clock time seriesGFZ E18 Allan deviation

GRG E18

GRG E18 clock time seriesGRG E18 Allan deviation

COD E19

COD E19 clock time seriesCOD E19 Allan deviation

GFZ E19

GFZ E19 clock time seriesGFZ E19 Allan deviation

GRG E19

GRG E19 clock time seriesGRG E19 Allan deviation

COD E21

COD E21 clock time seriesCOD E21 Allan deviation

GFZ E21

GFZ E21 clock time seriesGFZ E21 Allan deviation

GRG E21

GRG E21 clock time seriesGRG E21 Allan deviation

COD E24

COD E24 clock time seriesCOD E24 Allan deviation

GFZ E24

GFZ E24 clock time seriesGFZ E24 Allan deviation

GRG E24

GRG E24 clock time seriesGRG E24 Allan deviation

COD E25

COD E25 clock time seriesCOD E25 Allan deviation

GFZ E25

GFZ E25 clock time seriesGFZ E25 Allan deviation

GRG E25

GRG E25 clock time seriesGRG E25 Allan deviation

COD E26

COD E26 clock time seriesCOD E26 Allan deviation

GFZ E26

GFZ E26 clock time seriesGFZ E26 Allan deviation

GRG E26

GRG E26 clock time seriesGRG E26 Allan deviation

COD E27

COD E27 clock time seriesCOD E27 Allan deviation

GFZ E27

GFZ E27 clock time seriesGFZ E27 Allan deviation

GRG E27

GRG E27 clock time seriesGRG E27 Allan deviation

COD E30

COD E30 clock time seriesCOD E30 Allan deviation

GFZ E30

GFZ E30 clock time seriesGFZ E30 Allan deviation

GRG E30

GRG E30 clock time seriesGRG E30 Allan deviation

COD E31

COD E31 clock time seriesCOD E31 Allan deviation

GFZ E31

GFZ E31 clock time seriesGFZ E31 Allan deviation

GRG E31

GRG E31 clock time seriesGRG E31 Allan deviation

COD E33

COD E33 clock time seriesCOD E33 Allan deviation

GFZ E33

GFZ E33 clock time seriesGFZ E33 Allan deviation

GRG E33

GRG E33 clock time seriesGRG E33 Allan deviation

COD E36

COD E36 clock time seriesCOD E36 Allan deviation

GFZ E36

GFZ E36 clock time seriesGFZ E36 Allan deviation

GRG E36

GRG E36 clock time seriesGRG E36 Allan deviation

BDS satellite clock time series and Allan deviation

Coming Soon

Satellite Laser Ranging Residuals

Satellites per Constellation

BD3: m2 m3 m9 m10 BDS: g1 i3 i5 i6b m3 GAL: 101 102 103 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 GLO: 105 106 107 116 119 120 121 122 125 127 128 129 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 QZS: qzs1 qzs2 qzs3 qzs4

ACs per Constellation

BD3: wum BDS: com gbm SHA wum GAL: com gbm grm SHA tum wum GLO: com gbm grm JAX SHA wum QZS: com gbm JAX tum wum

Remarks

  • GFZ solution excluded before 1843/0 due to different sp3 sampling

Analysis Options

Editing limit : 0.5 m Elevation cutoff angle: 10 deg Station coordinates : Station_SLRF2014.snx

SLR retroreflector and CoM positions

Satellite X [m] Y [m] Z [m] __________ __________________ _________ _________ _________ compassg1 COG_POSITION +1.1525 +0.0002 0.0000 compassg1 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.6088 -0.5702 1.093 compassi3 COG_POSITION +1.0756 0.0000 -0.0004 compassi3 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.673 -0.573 +1.093 compassi5 COG_POSITION +1.0756 0.0000 -0.0004 compassi5 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.673 -0.573 +1.093 compassi6b COG_POSITION +1.0756 0.0000 -0.0004 compassi6b REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.673 -0.573 +1.093 compassis1 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 compassis1 REFLECTOR_POSITION -0.973 0.184 0.637 compassis2 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 compassis2 REFLECTOR_POSITION 0.185 0.685 1.960 compassm3 COG_POSITION +1.0820 -0.0004 -0.0005 compassm3 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.6499 -0.5625 +1.1123 compassms1 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 compassms1 REFLECTOR_POSITION 0.612 -0.072 1.249 compassms2 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 compassms2 REFLECTOR_POSITION 0.612 -0.072 1.245 beidou3m1 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 beidou3m1 REFLECTOR_POSITION 0.6120 -0.0720 1.2230 # REFLECTOR_POSITION 0.5947 -0.08456 1.26444 % CSNO beidou3m2 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 beidou3m2 REFLECTOR_POSITION 0.6120 -0.0720 1.2230 # REFLECTOR_POSITION 0.5986 -0.08656 1.26504 % CSNO beidou3m3 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 beidou3m3 REFLECTOR_POSITION 0.6120 -0.0720 1.2230 # REFLECTOR_POSITION 0.6095 0.426 0.6142 % CSNO beidou3m9 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 beidou3m9 REFLECTOR_POSITION 0.6646 0.4249 0.6427 # REFLECTOR_POSITION 0.6097 0.4273 0.6153 % CSNO beidou3m10 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 beidou3m10 REFLECTOR_POSITION 0.6646 0.4249 0.6427 galileo101 COG_POSITION -1.205844 -0.628967 +0.553436 galileo101 REFLECTOR_POSITION -2.298 -0.595 +1.174 galileo102 COG_POSITION -1.205333 -0.628807 +0.551409 galileo102 REFLECTOR_POSITION -2.298 -0.595 +1.174 galileo103 COG_POSITION -1.205291 -0.629577 +0.552809 galileo103 REFLECTOR_POSITION -2.298 -0.595 +1.174 galileo104 COG_POSITION -1.20532 -0.628956 +0.551509 galileo104 REFLECTOR_POSITION -2.298 -0.595 +1.174 galileo201 COG_POSITION -0.316893 +0.013481 +0.561918 galileo201 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.7030 +0.0275 +1.12045 galileo202 COG_POSITION -0.311614 +0.012599 +0.562306 galileo202 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.7030 +0.0275 +1.12045 galileo203 COG_POSITION -0.259538 +0.009244 +0.561166 galileo203 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.7030 +0.0275 +1.12045 galileo204 COG_POSITION -0.26114 +0.009241 +0.561163 galileo204 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.7030 +0.0275 +1.12045 galileo205 COG_POSITION -0.258563 +0.00988 +0.56546 galileo205 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.7030 +0.0275 +1.12045 galileo206 COG_POSITION -0.259231 +0.009506 +0.565264 galileo206 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.7030 +0.0275 +1.12045 galileo207 COG_POSITION -0.260935 +0.009519 +0.565285 galileo207 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.7030 +0.0275 +1.12045 galileo208 COG_POSITION -0.261075 +0.010433 +0.565284 galileo208 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.7030 +0.0275 +1.12045 galileo209 COG_POSITION -0.261492 -0.009604 +0.565001 galileo209 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.7030 +0.0275 +1.12045 galileo210 COG_POSITION -0.262177 +0.009609 +0.565283 galileo210 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.7030 +0.0275 +1.12045 galileo211 COG_POSITION -0.263081 +0.010239 +0.565267 galileo211 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.7030 +0.0275 +1.12045 galileo212 COG_POSITION -0.257018 +0.009873 +0.565267 galileo212 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.7030 +0.0275 +1.12045 galileo213 COG_POSITION -0.262297 +0.010329 +0.565265 galileo213 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.7030 +0.0275 +1.12045 galileo214 COG_POSITION -0.261469 +0.009414 +0.565263 galileo214 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.7030 +0.0275 +1.12045 galileo215 COG_POSITION -0.267 +0.011 +0.565 galileo215 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.7030 +0.0275 +1.12045 galileo216 COG_POSITION -0.260 +0.010 +0.565 galileo216 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.7030 +0.0275 +1.12045 galileo217 COG_POSITION -0.262 +0.011 +0.565 galileo217 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.7030 +0.0275 +1.12045 galileo218 COG_POSITION -0.261 +0.010 +0.565 galileo218 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.7030 +0.0275 +1.12045 galileo219 COG_POSITION -0.263 +0.010 +0.565 galileo219 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.7030 +0.0275 +1.12045 galileo220 COG_POSITION -0.263 +0.010 +0.565 galileo220 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.7030 +0.0275 +1.12045 galileo221 COG_POSITION -0.2617 +0.0093 +0.5653 galileo221 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.7030 +0.0275 +1.12045 galileo222 COG_POSITION -0.2618 +0.0099 +0.5653 galileo222 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.7030 +0.0275 +1.12045 giovea COG_POSITION 0.004 -0.001 0.796 giovea REFLECTOR_POSITION 0.832 0.654 1.476 gioveb COG_POSITION +0.0032 -0.0034 +0.9375 gioveb REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.8075 -0.2975 +2.2676 glonass86 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 glonass86 REFLECTOR_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 +1.5547 glonass87 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 glonass87 REFLECTOR_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 +1.5547 glonass89 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 glonass89 REFLECTOR_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 +1.5547 glonass95 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 glonass95 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.1370 -0.0030 +1.8737 glonass100 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 glonass100 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.1370 +0.0030 +1.8737 glonass101 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 glonass101 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.1370 +0.0030 +1.8737 glonass102 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 glonass102 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.1370 +0.0030 +1.8737 glonass103 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 glonass103 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.1370 +0.0030 +1.8737 glonass104 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 glonass104 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.1370 +0.0030 +1.8737 glonass105 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 glonass105 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.1370 +0.0030 +1.8737 glonass106 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 glonass106 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.1370 +0.0030 +1.8737 glonass107 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 glonass107 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.1370 +0.0030 +1.8737 glonass109 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 glonass109 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.1370 +0.0030 +1.8737 glonass111 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 glonass111 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.1370 +0.0030 +1.8737 glonass112 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 glonass112 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.1370 +0.0030 +1.8737 glonass115 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 glonass115 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.1370 +0.0030 +1.8737 glonass116 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 glonass116 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.1370 +0.0030 +1.8737 glonass117 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 glonass117 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.1370 +0.0030 +1.8737 glonass118 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 glonass118 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.1370 +0.0030 +1.8737 glonass119 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 glonass119 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.1370 +0.0030 +1.8737 glonass120 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 glonass120 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.1370 +0.0030 +1.8737 glonass121 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 glonass121 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.1370 +0.0030 +1.8737 glonass122 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 glonass122 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.1370 +0.0030 +1.8737 glonass123 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 glonass123 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.1370 +0.0030 +1.8737 glonass124 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 glonass124 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.1370 +0.0030 +1.8737 glonass125 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 glonass125 REFLECTOR_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 +1.4730 glonass126 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 glonass126 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.1370 +0.0030 +1.8737 glonass127 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 glonass127 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.1370 +0.0030 +1.8737 glonass128 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 glonass128 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.1370 +0.0030 +1.8737 glonass129 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 glonass129 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.1370 +0.0030 +1.8737 glonass130 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 glonass130 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.1370 +0.0030 +1.8737 glonass131 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 glonass131 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.1370 +0.0030 +1.8737 glonass132 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 glonass132 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.1370 +0.0030 +1.8737 glonass133 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 glonass133 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.1370 +0.0030 +1.8737 glonass134 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 glonass134 REFLECTOR_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 +1.4730 glonass135 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 glonass135 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.1370 +0.0030 +1.8737 glonass136 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 glonass136 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.1370 +0.0030 +1.8737 glonass137 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 glonass137 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.1370 +0.0030 +1.8737 glonass138 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 glonass138 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.1370 +0.0030 +1.8737 glonass139 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 glonass139 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.1370 +0.0030 +1.8737 glonass140 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 glonass140 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.1370 +0.0030 +1.8737 glonass141 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 glonass141 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.1370 +0.0030 +1.8737 glonass142 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 glonass142 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.1370 +0.0030 +1.8737 gps35 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 gps35 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.86258 -0.52451 0.6695 gps36 COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 gps36 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.86258 -0.52451 0.6717 irnss1a COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 irnss1a REFLECTOR_POSITION -0.4360 +0.5280 +1.1200 irnss1b COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 irnss1b REFLECTOR_POSITION -0.4360 +0.5280 +1.1200 irnss1c COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 irnss1c REFLECTOR_POSITION -0.4360 +0.5280 +1.1200 irnss1d COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 irnss1d REFLECTOR_POSITION -0.4360 +0.5280 +1.1200 irnss1e COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 irnss1e REFLECTOR_POSITION -0.4360 +0.5280 +1.1200 irnss1f COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 irnss1f REFLECTOR_POSITION -0.4360 +0.5280 +1.1200 irnss1g COG_POSITION 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 irnss1g REFLECTOR_POSITION -0.4360 +0.5280 +1.1200 qzs1 COG_POSITION +0.0011 -0.0016 1.8235 qzs1 REFLECTOR_POSITION +1.1500 +0.5500 4.5053 qzs2 COG_POSITION -0.0030 +0.0019 1.7711 qzs2 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.9882 +0.8608 4.3733 qzs3 COG_POSITION -0.0002 -0.0010 1.7759 qzs3 REFLECTOR_POSITION -1.0818 +0.4608 4.3733 qzs4 COG_POSITION -0.0033 +0.0014 1.7681 qzs4 REFLECTOR_POSITION +0.9882 +0.8608 4.3733

GLO SLR residuals

SLRRES_GLO_105_com.pngSLRRES_GLO_105_gbm.pngSLRRES_GLO_105_grm.pngSLRRES_GLO_105_JAX.pngSLRRES_GLO_106_com.pngSLRRES_GLO_106_gbm.pngSLRRES_GLO_106_grm.pngSLRRES_GLO_106_JAX.pngSLRRES_GLO_107_com.pngSLRRES_GLO_107_gbm.pngSLRRES_GLO_107_grm.pngSLRRES_GLO_107_JAX.pngSLRRES_GLO_116_com.pngSLRRES_GLO_116_gbm.pngSLRRES_GLO_116_grm.pngSLRRES_GLO_116_JAX.pngSLRRES_GLO_119_com.pngSLRRES_GLO_119_gbm.pngSLRRES_GLO_119_grm.pngSLRRES_GLO_119_JAX.pngSLRRES_GLO_120_com.pngSLRRES_GLO_120_gbm.pngSLRRES_GLO_120_grm.pngSLRRES_GLO_120_JAX.pngSLRRES_GLO_121_com.pngSLRRES_GLO_121_gbm.pngSLRRES_GLO_121_grm.pngSLRRES_GLO_121_JAX.pngSLRRES_GLO_122_com.pngSLRRES_GLO_122_gbm.pngSLRRES_GLO_122_grm.pngSLRRES_GLO_122_JAX.pngSLRRES_GLO_125_com.pngSLRRES_GLO_125_gbm.pngSLRRES_GLO_125_grm.pngSLRRES_GLO_125_JAX.pngSLRRES_GLO_127_com.pngSLRRES_GLO_127_gbm.pngSLRRES_GLO_127_grm.pngSLRRES_GLO_127_JAX.pngSLRRES_GLO_128_com.pngSLRRES_GLO_128_gbm.pngSLRRES_GLO_128_grm.pngSLRRES_GLO_128_JAX.pngSLRRES_GLO_129_com.pngSLRRES_GLO_129_gbm.pngSLRRES_GLO_129_grm.pngSLRRES_GLO_129_JAX.pngSLRRES_GLO_131_com.pngSLRRES_GLO_131_gbm.pngSLRRES_GLO_131_grm.pngSLRRES_GLO_131_JAX.pngSLRRES_GLO_132_com.pngSLRRES_GLO_132_gbm.pngSLRRES_GLO_132_grm.pngSLRRES_GLO_132_JAX.pngSLRRES_GLO_133_com.pngSLRRES_GLO_133_gbm.pngSLRRES_GLO_133_grm.pngSLRRES_GLO_133_JAX.pngSLRRES_GLO_134_com.pngSLRRES_GLO_134_gbm.pngSLRRES_GLO_134_grm.pngSLRRES_GLO_134_JAX.pngSLRRES_GLO_135_com.pngSLRRES_GLO_135_gbm.pngSLRRES_GLO_135_grm.pngSLRRES_GLO_135_JAX.pngSLRRES_GLO_136_com.pngSLRRES_GLO_136_gbm.pngSLRRES_GLO_136_grm.pngSLRRES_GLO_136_JAX.pngSLRRES_GLO_137_com.pngSLRRES_GLO_137_gbm.pngSLRRES_GLO_137_grm.pngSLRRES_GLO_137_JAX.pngSLRRES_GLO_138_com.pngSLRRES_GLO_138_gbm.pngSLRRES_GLO_138_grm.pngSLRRES_GLO_138_JAX.pngSLRRES_GLO_139_com.pngSLRRES_GLO_139_gbm.pngSLRRES_GLO_139_grm.pngSLRRES_GLO_139_JAX.pngSLRRES_GLO_140_com.pngSLRRES_GLO_140_gbm.pngSLRRES_GLO_140_grm.pngSLRRES_GLO_140_JAX.pngSLRRES_GLO_141_com.pngSLRRES_GLO_141_gbm.pngSLRRES_GLO_141_grm.pngSLRRES_GLO_142_com.pngSLRRES_GLO_142_gbm.pngSLRRES_GLO_142_grm.png

GAL SLR residuals

SLRRES_GAL_101_com.pngSLRRES_GAL_101_gbm.pngSLRRES_GAL_101_grm.pngSLRRES_GAL_101_tum.pngSLRRES_GAL_101_wum.pngSLRRES_GAL_102_com.pngSLRRES_GAL_102_gbm.pngSLRRES_GAL_102_grm.pngSLRRES_GAL_102_tum.pngSLRRES_GAL_102_wum.pngSLRRES_GAL_103_com.pngSLRRES_GAL_103_gbm.pngSLRRES_GAL_103_grm.pngSLRRES_GAL_103_tum.pngSLRRES_GAL_103_wum.pngSLRRES_GAL_201_com.pngSLRRES_GAL_201_gbm.pngSLRRES_GAL_201_grm.pngSLRRES_GAL_201_tum.pngSLRRES_GAL_201_wum.pngSLRRES_GAL_202_com.pngSLRRES_GAL_202_gbm.pngSLRRES_GAL_202_grm.pngSLRRES_GAL_202_tum.pngSLRRES_GAL_202_wum.pngSLRRES_GAL_203_com.pngSLRRES_GAL_203_gbm.pngSLRRES_GAL_203_grm.pngSLRRES_GAL_203_tum.pngSLRRES_GAL_203_wum.pngSLRRES_GAL_204_com.pngSLRRES_GAL_204_gbm.pngSLRRES_GAL_204_grm.pngSLRRES_GAL_204_tum.pngSLRRES_GAL_204_wum.pngSLRRES_GAL_205_com.pngSLRRES_GAL_205_gbm.pngSLRRES_GAL_205_grm.pngSLRRES_GAL_205_tum.pngSLRRES_GAL_205_wum.pngSLRRES_GAL_206_com.pngSLRRES_GAL_206_gbm.pngSLRRES_GAL_206_grm.pngSLRRES_GAL_206_tum.pngSLRRES_GAL_206_wum.pngSLRRES_GAL_207_com.pngSLRRES_GAL_207_gbm.pngSLRRES_GAL_207_grm.pngSLRRES_GAL_207_tum.pngSLRRES_GAL_207_wum.pngSLRRES_GAL_208_com.pngSLRRES_GAL_208_gbm.pngSLRRES_GAL_208_grm.pngSLRRES_GAL_208_tum.pngSLRRES_GAL_208_wum.pngSLRRES_GAL_209_com.pngSLRRES_GAL_209_gbm.pngSLRRES_GAL_209_grm.pngSLRRES_GAL_209_tum.pngSLRRES_GAL_209_wum.pngSLRRES_GAL_210_com.pngSLRRES_GAL_210_gbm.pngSLRRES_GAL_210_grm.pngSLRRES_GAL_210_tum.pngSLRRES_GAL_210_wum.pngSLRRES_GAL_211_com.pngSLRRES_GAL_211_gbm.pngSLRRES_GAL_211_grm.pngSLRRES_GAL_211_tum.pngSLRRES_GAL_211_wum.pngSLRRES_GAL_212_com.pngSLRRES_GAL_212_gbm.pngSLRRES_GAL_212_grm.pngSLRRES_GAL_212_tum.pngSLRRES_GAL_212_wum.pngSLRRES_GAL_213_com.pngSLRRES_GAL_213_gbm.pngSLRRES_GAL_213_grm.pngSLRRES_GAL_213_tum.pngSLRRES_GAL_213_wum.pngSLRRES_GAL_214_com.pngSLRRES_GAL_214_gbm.pngSLRRES_GAL_214_grm.pngSLRRES_GAL_214_tum.pngSLRRES_GAL_214_wum.pngSLRRES_GAL_215_com.pngSLRRES_GAL_215_gbm.pngSLRRES_GAL_215_grm.pngSLRRES_GAL_215_tum.pngSLRRES_GAL_215_wum.pngSLRRES_GAL_216_com.pngSLRRES_GAL_216_gbm.pngSLRRES_GAL_216_grm.pngSLRRES_GAL_216_tum.pngSLRRES_GAL_216_wum.pngSLRRES_GAL_217_com.pngSLRRES_GAL_217_gbm.pngSLRRES_GAL_217_grm.pngSLRRES_GAL_217_tum.pngSLRRES_GAL_217_wum.pngSLRRES_GAL_218_com.pngSLRRES_GAL_218_gbm.pngSLRRES_GAL_218_grm.pngSLRRES_GAL_218_tum.pngSLRRES_GAL_218_wum.pngSLRRES_GAL_219_com.pngSLRRES_GAL_219_gbm.pngSLRRES_GAL_219_grm.pngSLRRES_GAL_219_tum.pngSLRRES_GAL_219_wum.pngSLRRES_GAL_220_com.pngSLRRES_GAL_220_gbm.pngSLRRES_GAL_220_grm.pngSLRRES_GAL_220_tum.pngSLRRES_GAL_220_wum.pngSLRRES_GAL_221_com.pngSLRRES_GAL_221_gbm.pngSLRRES_GAL_221_grm.pngSLRRES_GAL_221_tum.pngSLRRES_GAL_221_wum.pngSLRRES_GAL_222_com.pngSLRRES_GAL_222_gbm.pngSLRRES_GAL_222_grm.pngSLRRES_GAL_222_tum.pngSLRRES_GAL_222_wum.png

BDS SLR residuals

SLRRES_BDS_g1_com.pngSLRRES_BDS_g1_gbm.pngSLRRES_BDS_g1_wum.pngSLRRES_BDS_i3_com.pngSLRRES_BDS_i3_gbm.pngSLRRES_BDS_i3_wum.pngSLRRES_BDS_i5_com.pngSLRRES_BDS_i5_gbm.pngSLRRES_BDS_i5_wum.pngSLRRES_BDS_i6b_com.pngSLRRES_BDS_i6b_gbm.pngSLRRES_BDS_i6b_wum.pngSLRRES_BDS_m3_com.pngSLRRES_BDS_m3_gbm.pngSLRRES_BDS_m3_wum.png

BD3 SLR residuals

SLRRES_BD3_m10_wum.pngSLRRES_BD3_m2_wum.pngSLRRES_BD3_m3_wum.pngSLRRES_BD3_m9_wum.png

QZS SLR residuals

Coming Soon

MGEX Orbit and Clock Comparison

AC Contributions

xmp> BDG: BeiDou GEO, BDI: BeiDou IGSO, BDM: BeiDou MEO AC BDG BDI BDM GAL GLO GPS QZS com: 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 gbm: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 grm: 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 JAX: 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 SHA: 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 tum: 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 wum: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Satellites per Constellation

BDG: C01 C02 C03 C04 C05 BDI: C06 C07 C08 C09 C10 C13 C16 BDM: C11 C12 C14 GAL: E01 E02 E03 E04 E05 E07 E08 E09 E11 E12 E13 E14 E15 E18 E19 E21 E24 E25 E26 E27 E30 E31 E33 E36 GLO: R01 R02 R03 R04 R05 R06 R07 R08 R09 R10 R11 R12 R13 R14 R15 R16 R17 R18 R19 R20 R21 R22 R23 R24 GPS: G01 G02 G03 G04 G05 G06 G07 G08 G09 G10 G11 G12 G13 G14 G15 G16 G17 G18 G19 G20 G21 G22 G23 G24 G25 G26 G27 G28 G29 G30 G31 G32 QZS: J01 J02 J03 J07

Analysis Options


"0 m" stands for no outlier rejection

Outlier rejection level for BDS and QZS satellites: 100 m Outlier rejection level for other satellites: 10 m

GPS Orbit and Clock Comparisons

EphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmp

GLO Orbit and Clock Comparisons

EphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmp

GAL Orbit and Clock Comparisons

EphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmp

BDM Orbit and Clock Comparisons

EphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmp

BDI Orbit and Clock Comparisons

EphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmp

BDG Orbit and Clock Comparisons

EphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmp

QZS Orbit and Clock Comparisons

EphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmpEphCmp